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Danish Plan

Driving to ban drilling

By Paul Danish

But the hypocrisy is beside the point. The real point is that even people who want to ban oil and gas drilling can’t live without it.

Danish Plan

Dad’s insecticides and Proposition 105

By Paul Danish

Chlordane, Heptachlor, Aldrin and Dieldrin are four of the nastiest insecticides ever produced. All four have been linked to a variety of cancers and other diseases, and all four have either been banned outright or severely restricted in their use by most countries for at least 20 years.

Danish Plan

Oklahoma isn’t the first to see radicalist beheadings

By Paul Danish

The Death Angels were a racist murder cult, which had been spawned by followers of the Black Muslim movement. They would ultimately kill at least 14 people during a reign of terror known as the Zebra murders.

Danish Plan

Think globally and frack locally

By Paul Danish

Starting in 1973, after a 400 percent spike in gasoline prices in the wake of the Yom Kippur War, U.S. politicians started calling for “energy independence” — by which they meant ramping up domestic oil production to the point where the country was no longer dependent on imported oil.

Danish Plan

Obama’s clueless view of ISIL

By Paul Danish

Now let’s make two things clear: ISIL is not “Islamic.” No religion condones the killing of innocents. And the vast majority of ISIL’s victims have been Muslim. And ISIL is certainly not a state.

Danish Plan

Ban GMOs? First show us the victims

By Paul Danish

What’s more, substantial amounts of GMO (genetically modified organism) corn, cotton, and soybeans have been grown and consumed in the U.S. for the last 14 years. In 2000, about a quarter of U.S. corn and more than 50 percent of U.S. soybeans and cotton were produced from GMO varieties.

Danish Plan

No blood for oil? Thank a fracking oilman.

By Paul Danish

(For the record, there were a number of reasons why the U.S. invaded Iraq in 2003, but grabbing Iraq’s oil wasn’t one of them. If there is any lingering doubt on this point, consult the list of oil companies which have gotten concessions from the Iraqi government.

Danish Plan

Who is a civilian?

By Paul Danish

The “contractor’s” business was security — or more plainly war. They worked for companies like Blackwater security and, among other things, served as armed guards for U.S. civilian personnel like American civil administrator Paul Bremer and scores of State Department operatives who negotiated with tribal leaders.

Danish Plan

Hamas does not give shelter

By Paul Danish

Hamas’ tunnels are not amateur works. A lot of them are 100 feet below the surface, lined with concrete, and equipped with electricity and ventilation systems. How is it then that that there aren’t any civilian bomb shelters in Gaza?

Danish Plan

Gaza and ‘game changers’

By Paul Danish

Gaza could also be demilitarized by the expulsion of Hamas, and its evil twin Islamic Jihad. So how likely is it that either of those things will happen? A lot more likely than it was on Monday, July 7.

Dodge's Bullets

Letting go of my hump day

By Jefferson Dodge

After nearly two years at the weekly Clear Creek Courant, a year at the Summit Daily News, 12 years at the CU faculty/staff newspaper Silver & Gold Record and four and half years at Boulder Weekly, I’m taking a job as communications coordinator for Colorado State University.

Dodge's Bullets

Some Colorado politicians still do not get that whole open records thing

By Jefferson Dodge

Election reform activist Marilyn Marks, who has exposed many untoward practices — like using ballots that can be traced back to individual voters — got dragged into court by Broomfield officials after she had the gall to ask for public election records, including voted ballots.

Dodge's Bullets

Grappling with preserving the past, for the future

By Jefferson Dodge

I had to write about a subject that is near and dear to my heart again, and I never quite know how to handle it. It is the now-defunct faculty/ staff newspaper for the University of Colorado, Silver & Gold Record, where I worked for 12 years.

Dodge's Bullets

The flood and the faces that matter

By Jefferson Dodge

Over the past dozen years, living in Longmont’s Southmoor Park, I’ve gone on lots of walks and bike rides with my kids on the path that runs along Left Hand Creek, which is about two blocks from our house.

Dodge's Bullets

One step closer

By Jefferson Dodge

When my dear friend Bonnie Lloyd gave opening remarks at a private ceremony April 30 before she and her partner, Pattea Carpenter, obtained one of the first civil-union licenses issued by Boulder County, she thanked us. She thanked the small group of close friends for treating her and Pattea as “normal,” for not treating them as a lesbian couple.

Dodge's Bullets

Papers, please: An attempt to infiltrate a closed meeting of a Boulder County board

By Jefferson Dodge

One key role of the press is to serve as the eyes and ears of the public at open meetings. After all, most folks have jobs and families and better things to do than sit through a boring county commissioners hearing or city council study session.

Dodge's Bullets

CU staff retire, double-dip, get paid, oh my!

By Jefferson Dodge

Yet another CU administrator has been “double-dipping,” we at Boulder Weekly have learned. And it’s not that big of deal. A bigger deal is how these things have been communicated. Much has been made lately about University of Colorado Boulder administrators, their tuition-funded salary increases and their ability to retire and get rehired — “double-dipping” by receiving their pension and a salary.

Dodge's Bullets

Save journalism education at CU

By Jefferson Dodge

I've noticed that CU officials are fond of saying that "discontinuance is an unfortunate term" when they talk about the closure of the J-School. (And even though a committee is still considering that closure, I think it's a done deal - they just have to study it for a few months to preserve the deliberative spirit of the university.

Dodge's Bullets

A regent race that actually matters

By Jefferson Dodge

Currently, the board is controlled by Republicans, 5-4. Three positions are up for election this November, and two of those seats are expected to stay with their current parties, given political dynamics in the First and Fourth Congressional Districts.

Dodge's Bullets

A wake-up call

By Jefferson Dodge

After all, most of us lead fairly secure, soft, comfortable lives, especially compared to people in Third World countries hell, even compared to parts of the United States.

DyerTimes

The rise of the green-talking climate change deniers

By Joel Dyer

We hear it all the time: “climate denier.” We spit the term like a swear word at the Koch brothers or countless Republican politicians. It’s a label we attach to oil and gas industry executives, coal barons and those who run our power generation plants. But what does it really mean to be a climate denier?

DyerTimes

Don't take the bait

Longmont Council appeals fracking ban decision, but beware Finley’s invitation

By Joel Dyer

You may recall that Tuesday’s vote was necessitated by Boulder County District Court Judge D.D. Mallard’s ruling in July that found Longmont didn’t have the authority to ban hydraulic fracturing within its city limits because the state was in charge...

DyerTimes

Behind the Polis Betrayal

By Joel Dyer

Well, the first mistake Colorado citizens made was they trusted a politician, Congressman Jared Polis, to help them with their cause.

DyerTimes

Fracking activists are the Tea Party of the Left?

Denver Post doing its part for the oil and gas industry’s disinformation campaign

By Joel Dyer

I’ve been waiting for the oil and gas industry to make this lame “Ralph Nader” argument to try to scare moderates. I just thought they would wait until mid October to trot it out.

DyerTimes

In the real world, playing politics on immigration is a lot like murder

By Joel Dyer

Without anyone saying a word, we began to slowly move to our left trying our best not make a sound as we bend low and make our way along a faint trail that disappears into the manzanita and chaparral.

DyerTimes

The Polis/Hickenlooper fracking compromise; thanks, but no thanks

By Joel Dyer

Apparently Congressman Jared Polis wants to reenact it at the state capital by way of Governor John Hickenlooper’s proposed special legislative session that could come as soon as June 8 and will aim to keep local control over oil and gas development off the ballot this fall.

DyerTimes

Why people who are unwilling to disclose their business relationships should not serve on city council

By Joel Dyer

I can’t believe that I’m having to write this in 2014. I can’t believe that there are actually elected members of Boulder City Council who are still acting like the idea of full disclosure of business relationships is somehow an inappropriate expectation.

DyerTimes

City’s cleanup of teahouse site actually deserves kudos

It surprised me as well

By Joel Dyer

I spend most of my life analyzing what local governments are doing poorly. But last week it struck me that in my two decades of reporting on contaminated properties in Boulder County, this was the first time that a cleanup plan didn’t make fast and cheap its primary priorities.

DyerTimes

COGA lawsuits against Lafayette, Fort Collins are latest insult to citizens by a selfish industry

By Joel Dyer

Honestly, do these people have no shame? News flash, COGA: You didn’t have to sue anyone, anywhere.

DyerTimes

Time for Longmont voters to push back on disgusting 'push polls' and those they benefit

By Joel Dyer

First off, let me just warn you that I’m pretty angry about what’s going on in Longmont’s city council races.

In Case You Missed It

In case you missed it

The findings, published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, examined the genomes of 825 white American couples, finding fewer differences in DNA between married people than randomly-selected individuals.

In Case You Missed It

In case you missed it

Austin Stewart, an assistant professor at Iowa State University, has created a virtual reality universe for chickens called Second Livestock. Yes, that’s a play on the Second Life virtual reality game where people become oddball avatars and socialize and flit about.

In Case You Missed It

In case you missed it

“When the Colorado Symphony accepted support from the legal cannabis industry — as a means of supporting our financial operations and connecting with a culturally diverse audience — we believed we did so in full compliance with the law,” the CSO says.

In Case You Missed It

In case you missed it

If you’re an expert science journo, you just might appear on Fox News’ Fox & Friends to opine about all things futuristic, like Google’s robot cars, gene therapy and how we’ll all be traveling in spaceships one day. Just don’t bring up climate change. That’s what Michael Moyer, an editor for Scientific American, learned last week. Asked what tops his crystal-ball-gazing list beforehand, he told a show producer “climate change.” That’s apparently not a good subject in Foxland.

In Case You Missed It

In case you missed it

Pot made national headlines — again — in the past week. This time it was remarks by Colorado Gov. John Hickenlooper that grabbed much of the attention. Ol’ Hick stood up to New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie and Christie’s opinion that our beautiful state’s fledgling marijuana industry isn’t the kind of “quality of life” that he’d wish for in Jersey.

In Case You Missed It

In case you missed it

COLORADO 12TH IN THE NATION FOR INCREASING STUDENT DEBT TWITTER BUYS GNIP BOULDER CRACKS CODE FOR HUMOR, BUT NOT TOP 50 ROBOTS GO TO WORK ON FLOOD

In Case You Missed It

In case you missed it

Senate Bill 181 eeked past a committee this week amid protests from police chiefs and the Colorado Municipal League that the cameras reduce accidents. But lawmakers on both sides of the aisle in both chambers are critical of the cameras, wary that they generate revenues for cities at the expense of their citizenry.

In Case You Missed It

In case you missed it

And it seems that even if the salmon is approved, the company will face an upstream fight in winning the hearts of consumers. Kroger, which runs King Soopers stores, Trader Joe’s, Safeway and Target are just the latest grocers to join a long list of those refusing to stock the fish on its shelves.

In Case You Missed It

In case you missed it

Child poverty. Virtual reality. Tumbleweeds. Its everything you might have missed this in this week's news.

In Case You Missed It

In case you missed it

News from the week of March 20

Scientists see the Big Bang and Detroit discovers more than 100 serial rapists.

Letters

LETTERS | Week of November 13

Danish misses the point, the election was bought, and public employees deserve better. Itīs this week in letters.

Letters

LETTERS

Response to BWīs fracking expose and readerīs views on the upcoming election.

Letters

Letters

Fracking in our back yards and diplomacy in Iran; itīs letters from the week of July 24.

Letters

LETTERS

Get the people into fracking prevention and the government out of mosquito prevention; itīs this week in letters.

Letters

Monsanto, miRagen response to last week’s BW ‘Muzzled by Monsanto story’

Just to be absolutely clear, miRagen’s sole motivation for conducting the studies in collaboration with Monsanto was to help determine if plants could provide an important new technology for the oral delivery of RNA-based human therapeutics and therapeutic foods.

Letters

LETTERS | week of March 27

This week we published letters regarding Oil & Gas ballot measures, Frozen Dead Guy Days, Boulder County Coroner Emma Hall, Macon Cowlesī love of animals vs love of homeless people, a search for an artist.

Letters

LETTERS

It's time to fire Danish, fracking is a travesty and the KKK were Democrats; Letters to Boulder Weekly for the week of March 20.

Letters

LETTERS | Week of March 13

Danish is wrong on water, an ode to home fries and thanks to the latino research and other things BW readers wrote about this week.

Letters

LETTERS | Week of March 6

Tom Tomorrow is fantastic, the writer of Tidbites is a lying neocon gasbag and stopping the privatization of 36.

Letters

LETTERS | Week of Feb. 27

In a stunning turn of events, readers didnīt like Paul Danishīs most recent column. Find out why.

Perspectives

Facing a crossroads

By Gary Swing

Climate change is happening now as a result of human industrial activity. Petrochemical agriculture threatens our health, food security and the environment. The livestock industry contributes to global warming, land degradation and air and water pollution.

Perspectives

Boulder County Democrats in conflict

By Dave Anderson

Among progressives, people hyperventilate about whether to vote for the Democrat or some third party candidate.

Perspectives

Bowl a strike for reproductive freedom

National Abortion Access Fund Bowl-a-Thon event fundraises for low-income access to abortion

By Dave Anderson

Everybody knows abortion became legal for all women with the ‘Roe v. Wade’ Supreme Court decision in 1973. Fewer people know that in 1976, poor women lost that fundamental right to determine whether or when to have children.

Perspectives

Paying to pump

Missing oil and gas severance tax revenue

By Dave Anderson

Colorado’s opportunities lie in tight sands and shale formations — especially the oil-rich Niobrara shale. Niobrara may hold a reserve the equivalent of as much as 2 billion barrels of oil, according to industry estimates.

Perspectives

Potholes in the road to privatization

By Dave Anderson

Studies show that privatization tends to cost more and provide lower quality services than the government.

Perspectives

Seeger’s true politics

By Dave Anderson

Folk singer Pete Seeger, who died at age 94 last month, provided a soundtrack for every progressive crusade of our time. Many obituaries have called him a “Stalinist,” but the label is somewhat misleading

Perspectives

ALEC’s attack on renewables arrives in Colorado

By Dave Anderson

America’s solar industry supplies less than 1 percent of the electricity in the U.S. but has experienced explosive growth. Unfortunately, there’s growing opposition from the utilities. A recent study by utilities think tank the Edison Electric Institute candidly says solar power is a future threat to the utilities.

Perspectives

Passing the TPP: Not so fast

By Dave Anderson

There isn’t any significant split over foreign policy or social issues. Now Democrats are divided over economics.

Perspectives

Stand up for Walmart workers

By Dave Anderson

Courageous Walmart workers have been striking and committing civil disobedience around the country.

Perspectives

It's time to open the vault on Kennedy

By Dave Anderson

President John Kennedy was killed 50 years ago. There is still considerable controversy about who did it. The release of 4 million pages of long-secret documents since Oliver Stone’s movie JFK clarified some disputes but raised new questions. Many thousands of pages are still secret.

Savage Love

Savage Love

By Dan Savage

Clit-having readers and clit-loving readers will be doubling over on the subway, in office cubicles, in the bathrooms aboard Air Force One — wherever my column is read, people will be doubling over.

Savage Love

SAVAGE LOVE

By Dan Savage

I consider myself one of the lucky ones: happily married for decades, with a long-term girlfriend. GF is at this point part of the family, and while it hasn’t always been an easy arrangement to sort out, it has worked for over a decade.

Savage Love

SAVAGE LOVE

By Dan Savage

Eight women have now spoken to the press; two have allowed themselves to be named. Ghomeshi claims that he is into BDSM and that all of these encounters were consensual, BAD, but I don’t believe that Ghomeshi is a consensual kinkster.

Savage Love

SAVAGE Love

By Dan Savage

My son is 15 going on 16, and he’s been experimenting with masturbation. At the moment, I pretty much just think fine, whatever, he’s a teenager, there’s very little I can do about it. So long as he doesn’t get porn-obsessed and start letting his grades slip, it’s fine.

Savage Love

SAVAGE Love

By Dan Savage

My husband recently admitted that he masturbates once a day, sometimes twice. My confusion stems from the fact that we have sex once a day, sometimes twice.

Savage Love

SAVAGE LOVE

By Dan Savage

Four years ago, I met a man on a “married but looking” website. We exchanged fantasies, which included wanting to have threesomes and a D/s relationship. He was 19 years my senior.

Savage Love

SAVAGE LOVE

By Dan Savage

girl. I would say there was nothing wrong if I could just lick feet to get the relationship a bit more “spicy,” but the problem is that I think I can’t excite myself the “traditional way.” I had a few girlfriends in the past, and when it was the time to penetrate, I got instantly limp.

Savage Love

SAVAGE LOVE

By Dan Savage

“Sounding refers to the insertion of foreign bodies into the urethra,” said Dr. Stephen H. King, MD, a board-certified urologist.

Savage Love

SAVAGE Love

By Dan Savage

I’m a 28-year-old pancurious married guy from the Midwest about to move to San Francisco. I’ve been with my wife for 10 years (married four), and we’ve started to explore being monogamish. I am also reexploring my bi attractions. I’ve been thinking a lot about the opportunities for reinvention that our cross-country move might provide.

Savage Love

SAVAGE Love

By Dan Savage

I’m the bisexual everyone loves to hate because I want to be in a poly relationship with both a man and a woman. I am a woman who is into commitment, loyalty, love, trust and honesty. I am not looking to cheat on anyone.

Stew's Views

Why the 'Weekly' makes political endorsements

By Stewart Sallo

We all need trusted, authoritative sources to help us make our decisions, and, while there is no guarantee that accessing these sources will result in a good decision being made, chances are that on the whole our decisions will work out better when they are made after careful consideration and with reliable information in hand.

Stew's Views

The work that makes a difference

By Stewart Sallo

Over the course of almost 20 years and 1,000 editions, hundreds of talented individuals have worked for Boulder Weekly.

Stew's Views

Jerry Garcia’s 70th

By Stewart Sallo

Every life is a story. And every story requires a soundtrack. For life is a sensual experience, and among the senses, the sounds — and, particularly, the music — that accompany life’s experiences provide a context that enriches and completes them.

Stew's Views

4/20 smoke-screen

By Stewart Sallo

There are so many angles from which to contemplate the wrong that CU is perpetrating with respect to its tactics to end the “4/20 smokeout” that one hardly knows where to begin.

Stew's Views

A better time, a better hero

By Stewart Sallo

But despite the strength and power that he displayed at the plate, Killebrew exemplified a humble and gentle demeanor that has been all but lost in a modern era of baseball that is rife with ill-behaved, overpaid, egomaniacal athletes. Babe Ruth was a womanizer; Mickey Mantle was an alcoholic; Pete Rose was a gambler; Barry Bonds cheated with steroids. But Harmon Killebrew was the kind of heroic role model that every 8-year-old boy needs and deserves...

Stew's Views

Bikes and 'boarders

By Stewart Sallo

In the interest of full disclosure, I am an avid mountain biker. I enjoy riding several times a week, weather permitting, and for me that includes temperatures as low as 40 degrees, so long as the trails are clear and rideable with no residual damage. I have been known to get up at the crack of dawn, sneak away from the office in the middle of the day or hit the trails after work, rushing home for dinner after dark to the disapproving.

Stew's Views

He moved me brightly

By Stewart Sallo

About 40 seconds into a 1967 CBS TV documentary about the thengrowing Hippie movement in San Franciscos Haight-Ashbury District (http:// tinyurl.com/2wvzjqq), a youthful, unbearded Jerry Garcia makes his first appearance.

Stew's Views

Dear readers, supporters and community partners:

By Stewart Sallo

As we bid goodbye to 2009 and set our sights not only on a new year but a new decade, I would like to share with you some of what has happened during the past year at Boulder's only independent newspaper, as well as what you can expect to see from us in the coming year.

The Highroad

Let workers vote on CEO’s pay

By Jim Hightower

One difference between top executives and worker bees is that those at the top can lower the pay of those down below, while simultaneously raising their own pay. If you wonder what’s causing America’s rapidly-widening income gap, there it is.

The Highroad

Reviving the Bush-Cheney torture policy

By Jim Hightower

There’s a new push — ironically coming from the Obama White House — to revive torture as an acceptable practice by the CIA and others for their interrogation of terrorist suspects.

The Highroad

State legislatures are helping rich lenders rip-off the poor

By Jim Hightower

Though they’ve tried to buffup their public image by calling themselves “consumer lenders,” their game remains the same ethical mess it’s always been. They target poor and financially struggling people, entice them to borrow with come-ons touting “quick and easy” money, then hook them to installment loans with interest rates up to 36 percent.

The Highroad

The real Halloween scaries of 2014

By Jim Hightower

If you want a real Halloween fright, don’t look for it among the trick-ortreaters coming to your door— just check out the Republican spooks tying to peddle panic in this political year.

The Highroad

The real Halloween scaries of 2014

By Jim Hightower

If you want a real Halloween fright, don’t look for it among the trick-ortreaters coming to your door— just check out the Republican spooks tying to peddle panic in this political year.

The Highroad

Big Beer deceivers and bullies

By Jim Hightower

It’s bad enough that the goliaths of Big Beer are consuming each other in a new round of mega-mergers, meaning fewer choices and higher prices for consumers — but the really bad news is that they’re also going after the one bright spot on tap in bars all across the country: Craft beers.

The Highroad

Buy local beer, books… and why not seafood?

By Jim Hightower

Thailand’s shrimp farms have been dumping untold volumes of antibiotics into their ponds — so we’re consuming the antibiotics that the imported shrimp consumed.

The Highroad

The mendacity of GMO purveyors

By Jim Hightower

Brand-name food peddlers are spending hundreds of millions of dollars on lobbyists, lawyers, campaign donations, PR hypesters and political manipulators so they can genetically (and dangerously) alter the dinner we put on our family tables, without bothering to tell us which items they’ve messed with.

The Highroad

Finding the money to fund higher education for all

By Jim Hightower

Question: Is making higher education available to every American more important to our national interest than letting Wall Street profiteers make a few more billions-of-dollars each year?

The Highroad

GOP to US infrastructure: All fall down

By Jim Hightower

Since the earliest days of our U.S. of A., the most basic task of this legislative body has been to keep our national house in good repair tending to roads, bridges, rail systems, airports, school buildings, parks, Internet access, etc. Yet, with a toxic mix of anti-government ideology and fiscal foolishness, congressional Republicans have recently been blocking every serious proposal to reinvest in America’s collapsing infrastructure.

Weed Between the Lines

Weed gets the votes; pot sales fall; edibles in confusion

By Leland Rucker

It should be no surprise that the working group tasked with coming up with a recommendation to the legislature about how cannabis edibles should be marked ended after four sessions and no consensus.

Weed Between the Lines

‘Dude, I think this whole town is high’

By Leland Rucker

One of the rules to be reviewed currently doesn’t allow retail shops to sell any marijuana-related merchandising.

Weed Between the Lines

Is the cannabis dialogue out of control?

By Leland Rucker

I had read the stories about the license plates. The profiling of Colorado drivers. Especially when using Interstate 76, the highway that connects Colorado to Interstate 80 in Nebraska.

Weed Between the Lines

Move over, Ebola: What you should panic about this week

By Cecelia Gilboy

Several major news outlets (including Fox and CBS) recently claimed that Colorado-based CB Scientific designed a product for parents to test Halloween candy for marijuana. That’s not accurate, says CB Scientific co-founder Derek Lebahn. His company actually developed these testkits for medical patients and plant breeders. They released them in September. Lebahn contacted a local CBS reporter, but he wasn’t interested.

Weed Between the Lines

High anxiety: The state of a highly regulated industry

By Cecelia Gilboy

John Caraluzzi, an owner of Trill Alternatives, says his employees spend almost 50 hours a month documenting plant waste. Alcohol producers, he notes, don’t have to document every drop they spill. He mentions a local brewery with a neighboring warehouse.

Weed Between the Lines

My cannabis poll is better than yours

The inherent bias of polls makes them meaningless

By Leland Rucker

Next time you read or watch a news story about a survey or poll, stop reading or turn it off. It doesn’t mean anything. It won’t help you understand anything. You’re better off watching videos of parkouring goats.

Weed Between the Lines

Jonathan Singer an unlikely cannabis advocate

By Leland Rucker

“If someone had told me in 2011 that three years later I would be running for re-election for a seat I didn’t have,” Singer, who rebelled in high school by not using cannabis, said recently. “Or that by the end of my second year that I would have helped pass a statewide tax increase on legal marijuana, I would have laughed at them.

Weed Between the Lines

Eric Holder’s mixed record on cannabis reform

By Leland Rucker

Eric Holder tendered his resignation last week, though he will stay in office until a successor is chosen for the attorney general position. Given congressional inertia on presidential nominees, he could still fill out Obama’s term, so I’m not holding my breath.

Weed Between the Lines

A cannabis ad campaign designed to educate, not frighten

By Leland Rucker

New York Times columnist Maureen Dowd took some serious shit earlier this year for a piece she wrote about her scary experience in a Denver hotel room after an overdose of cannabis edibles. She was mocked for being stupid, for not reading the packaging, for not waiting long enough before eating more. And of being sanctimonious and selfrighteous about it, too.

Weed Between the Lines

Are you the next Colorado marijuana millionaire?

By Leland Rucker

One of those statistics we’ll probably never learn definitively is how many people have ideas running through their heads right now that they think will make big money in Colorado Kush. Perhaps you do.

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