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Danish Plan

Why the latest climate report will be ignored

By Paul Danish

Nuclear power is a mature technology. It does not require further development (although further development will make it more efficient, economical and safer). Unlike wind and solar, it can supply base-load electricity at a competitive price. Until wind and solar can supply base-load electricity, they are not adequate replacements for fossil fuels.

Danish Plan

Marijuana along the Rio Grande

By Paul Danish

The Arizona Republic printed a terrific story last Sunday on the on-going war on marijuana smuggling being waged along the Rio Grande River in Texas.

Danish Plan

The green whine over U.S. gas exports

By Paul Danish

Coming from environmental organizations, the solicitous concern about the American consumers being socked with higher gas prices resulting from American natural gas exports is touching and about as surprising as Jack the Ripper coming out against vivisection.

Danish Plan

Obama, Putin and pigeon chess

By Paul Danish

So far, the response of the administration and its main European allies to Russia’s seizure of the Crimea and massing of troops on the Ukrainian border has been ludicrously flaccid.

Danish Plan

How to increase Colorado’s water supply

By Paul Danish

The best way to increase Colorado´s water supply is by increasing California´s. Really.

Danish Plan

A modest proposal to begin updating our national symbols

Start by replacing the eagle with the rat.

By Paul Danish

The time has come to replace the tired old bald eagle on the great seal of the United States and in other patriotic venues with a critter more in keeping with the lifestyle, values and morals of 21st-century America: The rat.

Danish Plan

America needs more secret meetings

Public meetings hamper compromise

By Paul Danish

The reason nothing gets done in Washington anymore is not, as commonly supposed, due to the lack of civility in the national political conversation. Meaningful political compromises can only be negotiated in secret, and the bigger the compromise, the more secret the negotiations have to be.

Danish Plan

Pot legalization day in Colorado more orderly than Black Friday

No reports of disturbances, no arrests, fist fights or tramplings

By Paul Danish

The early lines were not particularly long (dozens, not hundreds, by most accounts) and were laid-back, good-tempered and orderly — which is more than can be said for the crowds at a lot of New Year’s parties.

Danish Plan

Total elapsed time: 80 seconds

Good guy with gun stops bad guy with gun

By Paul Danish

The Arapahoe High attack occurred one day before the first anniversary of the Sandy Hook massacre. Its outcome showed that NRA President Wayne LaPierre was right

Danish Plan

The eagle has landed — with extreme prejudice

Wind turbines have killed at least 67 eagles in the last five years, and probably a lot more, according to a report issued last September by U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service biologists.

Dodge's Bullets

Letting go of my hump day

By Jefferson Dodge

After nearly two years at the weekly Clear Creek Courant, a year at the Summit Daily News, 12 years at the CU faculty/staff newspaper Silver & Gold Record and four and half years at Boulder Weekly, I’m taking a job as communications coordinator for Colorado State University.

Dodge's Bullets

Some Colorado politicians still do not get that whole open records thing

By Jefferson Dodge

Election reform activist Marilyn Marks, who has exposed many untoward practices — like using ballots that can be traced back to individual voters — got dragged into court by Broomfield officials after she had the gall to ask for public election records, including voted ballots.

Dodge's Bullets

Grappling with preserving the past, for the future

By Jefferson Dodge

I had to write about a subject that is near and dear to my heart again, and I never quite know how to handle it. It is the now-defunct faculty/ staff newspaper for the University of Colorado, Silver & Gold Record, where I worked for 12 years.

Dodge's Bullets

The flood and the faces that matter

By Jefferson Dodge

Over the past dozen years, living in Longmont’s Southmoor Park, I’ve gone on lots of walks and bike rides with my kids on the path that runs along Left Hand Creek, which is about two blocks from our house.

Dodge's Bullets

One step closer

By Jefferson Dodge

When my dear friend Bonnie Lloyd gave opening remarks at a private ceremony April 30 before she and her partner, Pattea Carpenter, obtained one of the first civil-union licenses issued by Boulder County, she thanked us. She thanked the small group of close friends for treating her and Pattea as “normal,” for not treating them as a lesbian couple.

Dodge's Bullets

Papers, please: An attempt to infiltrate a closed meeting of a Boulder County board

By Jefferson Dodge

One key role of the press is to serve as the eyes and ears of the public at open meetings. After all, most folks have jobs and families and better things to do than sit through a boring county commissioners hearing or city council study session.

Dodge's Bullets

CU staff retire, double-dip, get paid, oh my!

By Jefferson Dodge

Yet another CU administrator has been “double-dipping,” we at Boulder Weekly have learned. And it’s not that big of deal. A bigger deal is how these things have been communicated. Much has been made lately about University of Colorado Boulder administrators, their tuition-funded salary increases and their ability to retire and get rehired — “double-dipping” by receiving their pension and a salary.

Dodge's Bullets

Save journalism education at CU

By Jefferson Dodge

I've noticed that CU officials are fond of saying that "discontinuance is an unfortunate term" when they talk about the closure of the J-School. (And even though a committee is still considering that closure, I think it's a done deal - they just have to study it for a few months to preserve the deliberative spirit of the university.

Dodge's Bullets

A regent race that actually matters

By Jefferson Dodge

Currently, the board is controlled by Republicans, 5-4. Three positions are up for election this November, and two of those seats are expected to stay with their current parties, given political dynamics in the First and Fourth Congressional Districts.

Dodge's Bullets

A wake-up call

By Jefferson Dodge

After all, most of us lead fairly secure, soft, comfortable lives, especially compared to people in Third World countries hell, even compared to parts of the United States.

DyerTimes

Why people who are unwilling to disclose their business relationships should not serve on city council

By Joel Dyer

I can’t believe that I’m having to write this in 2014. I can’t believe that there are actually elected members of Boulder City Council who are still acting like the idea of full disclosure of business relationships is somehow an inappropriate expectation.

DyerTimes

City’s cleanup of teahouse site actually deserves kudos

It surprised me as well

By Joel Dyer

I spend most of my life analyzing what local governments are doing poorly. But last week it struck me that in my two decades of reporting on contaminated properties in Boulder County, this was the first time that a cleanup plan didn’t make fast and cheap its primary priorities.

DyerTimes

COGA lawsuits against Lafayette, Fort Collins are latest insult to citizens by a selfish industry

By Joel Dyer

Honestly, do these people have no shame? News flash, COGA: You didn’t have to sue anyone, anywhere.

DyerTimes

Time for Longmont voters to push back on disgusting 'push polls' and those they benefit

By Joel Dyer

First off, let me just warn you that I’m pretty angry about what’s going on in Longmont’s city council races.

DyerTimes

Vaya con Dios

Who wants to live in a world where you can’t ride your horse to Utah?

By Joel Dyer

Ellen asked me what I was thinking, and it all became clear as the words left my mouth. “I don’t want to live in a world where you can’t ride your horse to Utah.” It was exactly what I was feeling, and it had nothing to do with horses.

DyerTimes

Don’t trade pennies for your planet

Why we must municipalize our electric utility

By Joel Dyer

is an old political joke in my business in which a reporter who doesn’t much care for a particular candidate shouts out at a press conference, “Do you still beat your wife?” The candidate, who of course has never done such a despicable thing, quickly responds that the whole thing is a vicious lie.

DyerTimes

NSA's domestic spying program: Beware the wolf

Our government’s domestic spying has damaged the nation more than any terrorist attack ever could

By Joel Dyer

If you just thought to yourself, “It makes me feel safer,” do America a favor and never vote again.

DyerTimes

Failure to extend drilling moratorium sparks talk of recall election for commissioners

By Joel Dyer

If the emails crossing my screen these days are to be believed, then last week's vote by the Boulder County commissioners to allow the county's moratorium on oil and gas drilling to expire is shaping up to be the Lexington/Concord of the great fracking showdown.

DyerTimes

Hiding behind the flag

How the oil and gas industry exploits patriotism to screw America

By Joel Dyer

Every time I drive by a drilling rig with an American flag attached to it I want to tear it down and hand-deliver it, along with a few choice words, to the industry marketing jerk who signed the order to put it there.

DyerTimes

The bad news: Hickenlooper is not delusional

By Joel Dyer

Colorado’s Republi … Democratic Gov. John Hickenlooper was in Boulder a few days back speaking at the FrackingSENSE lecture series that the University of Colorado puts on. As is the norm for the governor these days, he spent a fair amount of time bemoaning his reputation as a puppet of the oil and gas industry.

In Case You Missed It

In case you missed it

Senate Bill 181 eeked past a committee this week amid protests from police chiefs and the Colorado Municipal League that the cameras reduce accidents. But lawmakers on both sides of the aisle in both chambers are critical of the cameras, wary that they generate revenues for cities at the expense of their citizenry.

In Case You Missed It

In case you missed it

And it seems that even if the salmon is approved, the company will face an upstream fight in winning the hearts of consumers. Kroger, which runs King Soopers stores, Trader Joe’s, Safeway and Target are just the latest grocers to join a long list of those refusing to stock the fish on its shelves.

In Case You Missed It

In case you missed it

Child poverty. Virtual reality. Tumbleweeds. Its everything you might have missed this in this week's news.

In Case You Missed It

In case you missed it

News from the week of March 20

Scientists see the Big Bang and Detroit discovers more than 100 serial rapists.

In Case You Missed It

In case you missed it | Week of March 13

All the best sort-of news that you may have missed this week.

In Case You Missed It

In case you missed it | Week of March 6

In case you were wondering, the reason given for the closure is that it causes serious disruptions to “research, teaching and learning.” That argument was specious enough last year when 4/20 landed on a Saturday. But since even less of that stuff is happening on a Sunday — like, none — it begs the question: CU, are you high?.

In Case You Missed It

In case you missed it

What´s the scuttlebutt this week? Prisons, Pussy Riot and total state-level dysfunction.

In Case You Missed It

In case you missed it | week of Feb. 6

Prairie dogs and fracking

WildEarth Guardians has released its anxiously awaited, sixth annual report card on how certain states and the feds are doing in protecting our official county mascot, and Colorado got the second-highest grade, a B-minus!

In Case You Missed It

In case you missed it

Where’s the outpouring of support for the ’coon? After all, what’s the difference between this and the Mapleton elk? We demand that a statue be erected in honor of this poor oversized rodent, or at least a bench. Complete with candlelight vigils. And why hasn’t someone recorded a song for the Wikimedia Commons.

In Case You Missed It

In case you missed it | POT AND DRONES

Pot and drones

What we found was that there were many opportunities for a community like Deer Trail to take advantage of drone-shooting, and we secretly hoped that Boulder’s bid for a testing site would afford us the chance of taking aim at low-flying, constitutionally questionable surveillance devices.

Letters

Monsanto, miRagen response to last week’s BW ‘Muzzled by Monsanto story’

Just to be absolutely clear, miRagen’s sole motivation for conducting the studies in collaboration with Monsanto was to help determine if plants could provide an important new technology for the oral delivery of RNA-based human therapeutics and therapeutic foods.

Letters

LETTERS | week of March 27

This week we published letters regarding Oil & Gas ballot measures, Frozen Dead Guy Days, Boulder County Coroner Emma Hall, Macon Cowles´ love of animals vs love of homeless people, a search for an artist.

Letters

LETTERS

It's time to fire Danish, fracking is a travesty and the KKK were Democrats; Letters to Boulder Weekly for the week of March 20.

Letters

LETTERS | Week of March 13

Danish is wrong on water, an ode to home fries and thanks to the latino research and other things BW readers wrote about this week.

Letters

LETTERS | Week of March 6

Tom Tomorrow is fantastic, the writer of Tidbites is a lying neocon gasbag and stopping the privatization of 36.

Letters

LETTERS | Week of Feb. 27

In a stunning turn of events, readers didn´t like Paul Danish´s most recent column. Find out why.

Letters

LETTERS | Week of Feb. 20

Latino history, local elections and toll roads. Here´s what BW readers want to say this week.

Letters

LETTERS | Week of Feb. 13

BW readers sound off about candidates trying to whitewash their records, and the origins of the Spanish Jews.

Letters

LETTERS | Week of Feb. 6

Congrats, Danish critiques and more

Paul Danish is correct: politicians are unlikely to compromise when negotiations are public. But his proposal treats a symptom, not the disease.

Letters

LETTERS | Week of Jan. 23

We’ve allowed the coming of an age where the civil liberties our forefathers fought so hard for are being eroded by the day. Freedom of press, freedom of speech and freedom of assembly are mere ghostly images of their original intent.

Perspectives

Bowl a strike for reproductive freedom

National Abortion Access Fund Bowl-a-Thon event fundraises for low-income access to abortion

By Dave Anderson

Everybody knows abortion became legal for all women with the ‘Roe v. Wade’ Supreme Court decision in 1973. Fewer people know that in 1976, poor women lost that fundamental right to determine whether or when to have children.

Perspectives

Paying to pump

Missing oil and gas severance tax revenue

By Dave Anderson

Colorado’s opportunities lie in tight sands and shale formations — especially the oil-rich Niobrara shale. Niobrara may hold a reserve the equivalent of as much as 2 billion barrels of oil, according to industry estimates.

Perspectives

Potholes in the road to privatization

By Dave Anderson

Studies show that privatization tends to cost more and provide lower quality services than the government.

Perspectives

Seeger’s true politics

By Dave Anderson

Folk singer Pete Seeger, who died at age 94 last month, provided a soundtrack for every progressive crusade of our time. Many obituaries have called him a “Stalinist,” but the label is somewhat misleading

Perspectives

ALEC’s attack on renewables arrives in Colorado

By Dave Anderson

America’s solar industry supplies less than 1 percent of the electricity in the U.S. but has experienced explosive growth. Unfortunately, there’s growing opposition from the utilities. A recent study by utilities think tank the Edison Electric Institute candidly says solar power is a future threat to the utilities.

Perspectives

Passing the TPP: Not so fast

By Dave Anderson

There isn’t any significant split over foreign policy or social issues. Now Democrats are divided over economics.

Perspectives

Stand up for Walmart workers

By Dave Anderson

Courageous Walmart workers have been striking and committing civil disobedience around the country.

Perspectives

It's time to open the vault on Kennedy

By Dave Anderson

President John Kennedy was killed 50 years ago. There is still considerable controversy about who did it. The release of 4 million pages of long-secret documents since Oliver Stone’s movie JFK clarified some disputes but raised new questions. Many thousands of pages are still secret.

Perspectives

Limit corporate welfare

By Dave Anderson

Tea party politicians are denounced for their dangerous antics, but their doomsday warnings about profligate government spending are the conventional wisdom of the so-called “moderates” of big business, the mainstream media and too many politicians of both parties (including Colorado Sens. Bennet and Udall and Rep. Jared Polis).

Perspectives

Sometimes, the government comes in handy

By Dave Anderson

Americans have a love/hate relationship with government, condemning those wasteful and corrupt government bureaucrats in the abstract while praising many public services in the concrete like the fire department, schools or parks.

Savage Love

SAVAGE Love

By Dan Savage

Ultimately, I want to have a boyfriend and a girlfriend. He is not keen on the idea. He says he feels like he is not enough for me. I reassure him constantly that this is not the case. He is everything I want in a man, but I still crave a woman’s company.

Savage Love

SAVAGE Love

By Dan Savage

I’m an old guy, fast approaching geezerdom. After 45 years of marriage to the same woman, the sex has fallen off to zero. We otherwise have a great and comfortable relationship. If I want any at all these days, the only options are masturbation or professional service providers.

Savage Love

SAVAGE Love

By Dan Savage

My boyfriend of three months, “Marcus,” told me last week that he is a trans man. He’s performed oral sex on me and fingered me, but he never let me reciprocate and told me he didn’t want to have penis-in-vagina sex yet because that was a large commitment.

Savage Love

SAVAGE Love

By Dan Savage

READERS: A crowd of smart, engaged students packed a theater for Savage Love Live at Centenary College of Louisiana last week. Centenary is a terrific liberal-arts school in Shreveport. Centenary students submitted more Qs than I could possibly A in the 90 minutes I had with them.

Savage Love

SAVAGE Love | Week of March 20

By Dan Savage

I am a het husband. Before we married, I let my wife know that I loved spanking women and I was not a faithful man. Fast-forward 20 years: She does not like to be spanked and does not want me cheating.

Savage Love

SAVAGE Love | Week of March 13

By Dan Savage

I have a slowly terminal disease and don’t have more than five or six years left. I haven’t told my wife, which brings me to my problem.

Savage Love

SAVAGE Love | Week of March 6

By Dan Savage

Straight female with a question. It’s about something that sometimes happens to me that I’ve never really told anyone about because it’s so weird and gross. It involves my bowel movements, so it’s not very sexy.

Savage Love

SAVAGE Love | Week of Feb. 27

By Dan Savage

I’m a 25-year-old bi girl in the Southwest, and I’ve been with the same hetero guy for almost three years. I miss being with women.

Savage Love

SAVAGE Love | Week of Feb. 20

Are we cuckolding right?

By Dan Savage

Sex was infrequent and stultifying. Finally, when the kids were old enough, I made plans to separate. When my wife got wind of these plans, she finally agreed to work on our relationship.

Savage Love

SAVAGE Love

What's an unattractive fella to do?

By Dan Savage

I’m a 24-year-old straight male and I’m unattractive. Physically I’m not bad (not hot, but not ugly), but sadly, I’ve suffered from extreme depression all my life.

Stew's Views

Why the 'Weekly' makes political endorsements

By Stewart Sallo

We all need trusted, authoritative sources to help us make our decisions, and, while there is no guarantee that accessing these sources will result in a good decision being made, chances are that on the whole our decisions will work out better when they are made after careful consideration and with reliable information in hand.

Stew's Views

The work that makes a difference

By Stewart Sallo

Over the course of almost 20 years and 1,000 editions, hundreds of talented individuals have worked for Boulder Weekly.

Stew's Views

Jerry Garcia’s 70th

By Stewart Sallo

Every life is a story. And every story requires a soundtrack. For life is a sensual experience, and among the senses, the sounds — and, particularly, the music — that accompany life’s experiences provide a context that enriches and completes them.

Stew's Views

4/20 smoke-screen

By Stewart Sallo

There are so many angles from which to contemplate the wrong that CU is perpetrating with respect to its tactics to end the “4/20 smokeout” that one hardly knows where to begin.

Stew's Views

A better time, a better hero

By Stewart Sallo

But despite the strength and power that he displayed at the plate, Killebrew exemplified a humble and gentle demeanor that has been all but lost in a modern era of baseball that is rife with ill-behaved, overpaid, egomaniacal athletes. Babe Ruth was a womanizer; Mickey Mantle was an alcoholic; Pete Rose was a gambler; Barry Bonds cheated with steroids. But Harmon Killebrew was the kind of heroic role model that every 8-year-old boy needs and deserves...

Stew's Views

Bikes and 'boarders

By Stewart Sallo

In the interest of full disclosure, I am an avid mountain biker. I enjoy riding several times a week, weather permitting, and for me that includes temperatures as low as 40 degrees, so long as the trails are clear and rideable with no residual damage. I have been known to get up at the crack of dawn, sneak away from the office in the middle of the day or hit the trails after work, rushing home for dinner after dark to the disapproving.

Stew's Views

He moved me brightly

By Stewart Sallo

About 40 seconds into a 1967 CBS TV documentary about the thengrowing Hippie movement in San Franciscos Haight-Ashbury District (http:// tinyurl.com/2wvzjqq), a youthful, unbearded Jerry Garcia makes his first appearance.

Stew's Views

Dear readers, supporters and community partners:

By Stewart Sallo

As we bid goodbye to 2009 and set our sights not only on a new year but a new decade, I would like to share with you some of what has happened during the past year at Boulder's only independent newspaper, as well as what you can expect to see from us in the coming year.

The Highroad

Let’s cheer for NFL cheerleaders

By Jim Hightower

The National Football League is continuing to run an off-field power play against its valuable female team players. Women on NFL teams? Yes—not running plays, but on the sidelines running the synchronized gymnastics and precision dance routines of professional cheerleaders.

The Highroad

U.S. Postal Service selling out workers and… America

By Jim Hightower

Not Walmart-style “jobettes,” but real jobs, stable ones with a good salary and benefits, union jobs so workers have a say in what goes on, jobs that have strong protections against discrimination. A job you could make a career, do useful work, take pride in it, earn promotions, and be respected for what you do.

The Highroad

The mobsters of Wall Street

By Jim Hightower

Assume that you ran a business that was found guilty of bribery, forgery, perjury, defrauding homeowners, fleecing investors, swindling consumers, cheating credit card holders, violating U.S. trade laws and bilking American soldiers. Can you even imagine the punishment you’d get?.

The Highroad

Shouldn’t natural foods actually be natural?

By Jim Hightower

PepsiCo has quietly dropped the volatile “natural” claim from its snack packages, rebranding them with just the word “Simply.

The Highroad

Millionaire lawmakers can rise above their financial handicap

By Jim Hightower

The news that more than half of congress are now millionaires helps explain why it has been striving ceaselessly to provide more government giveaways to Wall Street, while also striving to enact government takeaways from middle-class and poor families.

The Highroad

The flim flam of the Employment Policies Institute

By Jim Hightower

The Employment Policies Institute has recently run full-page newspaper ads alerting the public and policymakers that an impressive group of some 650 economists who are supporting an increase in America’s minimum wage are “radical researchers.

The Highroad

Congressional critters get cozy with lobbyists

By Jim Hightower

A corporate lobbyist recently admitted to the New York Times: “Everybody is embarrassed about it. Although not so embarrassed that they don’t do it.”

The Highroad

Making consumer protection into corporate protection

By Jim Hightower

Anything less than mandatory GMO labeling is flagrant consumer fraud.

The Highroad

The super-rich literally live in their own world

By Jim Hightower

The latest trend is not simply to buy a fabulous house overlooking the pink sand beaches of some resort island — but to buy your very own Caribbean island.

The Highroad

What if antibiotics no longer work?

Germs are becoming resistant over time

By Jim Hightower

Can antibiotic medicines, long hailed as miracle drugs, be too much of a good thing? Yes.

Weed Between the Lines

Drug-endangered child bill goes way too far

By Leland Rucker

Testimony was expected this week on Rep. Jonathan Singer’s House Bill 1364, which would add post-traumatic stress disorder to the list of debilitating medical conditions for the purposes of the use of medical marijuana.

Weed Between the Lines

CBS slaps down Weedmaps’ Times Square ad

By Leland Rucker

More good news about the end of cannabis prohibition. A new PEW poll indicates that 75 percent of voters say legalization is a foregone conclusion. Oregon Congressman Earl Blumenauer, who along with Rep.

Weed Between the Lines

Medical cannabis heads toward the tipping point

By Leland Rucker

Weed, the CNN documentary anchored by Dr. Sanjay Gupta that aired last summer, highlighted the case of Charlotte Figi, a Colorado girl whose epileptic seizures were calmed by use of a special strain of cannabis high in cannabidiol, or CBD, a cannabinoid associated with the plant’s medical properties.

Weed Between the Lines

Hickenlooper should stay curious about cannabis

By Leland Rucker

I have been puzzled by Hickenlooper´s stance toward cannabis. He says he tried it when he was younger and didn’t care for it. His signature is on the document that made cannabis legal in Colorado. Yet he strongly opposed Amendment 64’s passage and has carried it out — seemingly while holding his nose.

Weed Between the Lines

A New Leaf chronicles the demise of prohibition

By Leland Rucker

“I’m from upstate New York, and I traveled to California,” Martin said during a recent interview. “I had never been to Venice Beach. I opened the car door and smelled marijuana and asked how they were able to have it. They said it was legal there. It was immediately the kind of federal-state clash that attracted me.

Weed Between the Lines

Why not base cannabis treatment on science instead of fear?

By Leland Rucker

Let’s hope that the creative solution attorney Jeff Gard came up with, aided by Nederland’s government and citizens, will allow adults to consume cannabis in much the same way as they do alcohol and remain within the boundaries of state and local laws.

Weed Between the Lines

MIG helps make marijuana businesses work

By Leland Rucker

“That’s the environment in which my trade association formed,” Elliott told me recently. “We took the philosophy of ‘If we don’t hang together, we’re going to hang separately’ and pooled our resources.

Weed Between the Lines

Terrapin Station opens a new era in Boulder commerce

City's first retail pot shop now open

By Leland Rucker

It might not have been as big a moment as the day retail sales began in Denver on Jan. 1. There were no national media gawking or television cameras rolling last Friday at 8:30 a.m.

Weed Between the Lines

Heading for a showdown on cannabis and banking?

By Leland Rucker

The Obama administration issued guidelines for banks to work with cannabusinesses. But it´s not as simple a solution as it has been portrayed.

Weed Between the Lines

Cannabis should not be a controlled substance

Feds grappling with their own rules

By Leland Rucker

As more state legislatures vote to allow medical marijuana use and research, and public approval in the United States for ending the federal ban on cannabis continues to rise, there is still much official opposition. And perhaps the most entrenched opponents are those in Washington actually charged with enforcing that federal ban.

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