<![CDATA[Boulder - Weekly - Restaurant Review]]> <![CDATA[An authentic Mexican taqueria]]> Whenever I go back to the Bay Area for family visits, it’s inevitable I stop by San Leandro’s Taqueria Los Pericos with one or both of my brothers. I suspect our visits are equally driven by the quality of the food as well as having us be seen in public for the purpose of establishing an alibi. Regardless, my brothers introduced me to authentic street-style tacos, and I completely understand their loyalty to this proverbial hole-in-the-wall. ]]> <![CDATA[A farmhouse kitchen and pub]]> This new self-styled farmhouse kitchen and pub distinguishes itself by offering locavore small plates as well as a relatively affordable prix fixe menu spotlighting ingredients from Chef Eric Skokan’s farm.]]> <![CDATA[The unique taste of Peru]]> On the table are communal plates of traditional Peruvian cuisine: lomo saltado, pollo a la parilla, chupe de camarones and tarralin verde. The table was colorful and vibrant with food, prepared from recipes brought to Longmont direct from a Peruvian cooking school, where Rosario’s mother is a teacher of Peruvian cuisine.]]> <![CDATA[Getting dizzy on Boulder’s newest donuts]]> I fed Mara donuts until she wept. Well, not really, although we certainly did a fine job of indulging ourselves at Dizzy’s Donuts, Boulder’s newest venue serving fresh takes on old-school baked goods.]]> <![CDATA[A taste of New York]]> "Do you use Fox’s U-Bet syrup in your egg creams?” I asked, in the manner of a character in a spy movie probing the bona fides of a new but unproven contact.]]> <![CDATA[A culinary effort to infuse with brews]]> Located near 30th Street, Twisted Pine features a menu of comforting tavern fare that pairs well with the brewery’s signature ales. Appetizers here include grilled cheese bites, spinach dip and nachos. There are also pizza rolls accompanied by sauces like homemade ranch and pesto, soups and chicken chili, salads, sandwiches and pizza.]]> <![CDATA[The food is the thing]]> In the clown car kitchen of China Gourmet in Boulder, a dozen cooks are calmly doing two dozen things. Composed but busy, the kitchen is preparing Chinese-American standards like cashew chicken, mu shu pork and Szechwan beef alongside “Shanghai specials” like cold salty duck, kung pao squid, salt-andpepper soft shell crab and “Ants Climbing a Tree.]]> <![CDATA[Cheese Importers warehouse expands to offer more than cheese]]> Themed shops and restaurants — whether French, Mexican, Southwestern or others — can either go very right, as in tasteful, or very wrong, as in tacky. Bistrot des Artistes has been done tastefully.]]> <![CDATA[Boiling point]]> Just one thing I want to know: how come I have to be Mr. Pink?” my co-worker Caitlin Rockett asked on our way to The Huckleberry in old town Louisville. But we weren’t headed there to pull a Reservoir Dogs; we were going to have a tea party.]]> <![CDATA[Authentic import]]> Chez Thuy rewards the brave. The menu is large and varied, representing Vietnamese cuisine that blends French, Chinese, Thai and Indonesian elements. There are myriad noodle dishes, many familiar. There are appetizers, soups, meats and curries that are no doubt delicious, but that are available at about the same quality just about everywhere.]]> <![CDATA[Double vision]]> Unsurprisingly, the Asian fusion restaurant was all about combinations. But not in the way one might expect. Indeed, expectations for Bao Asian Fusion in Louisville were sort of blurry. The building is a big beige block on a busy intersection, flanked by a closed-down Chili’s and an Outback Steakhouse, that you have to drive through a McDonald’s parking lot to get to.]]> <![CDATA[The secret]]> Not because the food isn’t fantastic, but because while most Boulder restaurants are clustered in one of the city’s two walking neighborhoods, or in major-roadway stripmalls you could easily wander into, Dagabi Cucina is tucked away in the back spot...]]> <![CDATA[An authentic taste of old Europe in Boulder]]> It’s not often that one draws upon the terms evocative or cinematic to describe a local dining establishment’s ambience, but in the case of Boulder’s freshly brewed Bohemian Biergarten, it’s entirely warranted.]]> <![CDATA[Simply satisfying]]> Perhaps nowhere else in Boulder County is food tied to a place as much as Tibet’s Restaurant & Bar in Louisville is to the country and perspective of its namesake. The interior is designed with care and intention. The owners Mark Herman, and Kami and Pasang Sherpa, the latter two of whom are from Nepal, have carefully placed artifacts throughout the restaurant to effect calm and pleasure. “Each decoration,” the owners write, “serves as a reminder of Buddhist philosophy. … Tibet’s has been decorated with strategically placed items to create the best energy for the space.”]]> <![CDATA[Peep this]]> It would be a lie to call Le Peep “Boulder’s best kept secret.” For one, the diner is a chain with dozens of locations, and it’s been in Boulder for 30 years or so. The chain has been around even longer. Then there’s the fact that it’s got a reasonable level of bustle in a central location.]]> <![CDATA[Hiding in plain sight]]> Whether you like it or not, there is a perception outside of Colorado that steakhouses abound in this state. The assumption is that cattle farms abound out here, and that meat from top Angus and Kobe beef farms throughout the West is shipped to a bevy of hungry consumers at any number of steakhouses along the Front Range.]]> <![CDATA[McFoodies]]> Regardless of whether you’re on Team Offal, Team Slow Food or Team Molecular Gastronomy, a consistent theme in modern culinary thought is the idea of rejecting an industrialized food system, either to maximize the variety of experience, source effectively, or have an intimate knowledge of what you are eating in order to better hack your metabolism.]]> <![CDATA[The return of succulent sushi]]> About a year ago, I was dismayed to learn that Longmont's Ichiban was suspending its sushi and sashimi service, as this was perhaps my favorite spot for variations on the raw fish theme. I was out of sorts until learning that a retooled version of Ichiban reopened late last fall with sushi Sensei John back at the helm.]]> <![CDATA[Mary’s is not just for cyclists]]> Mary’s has the welcoming feel of the archetypical country store, with a warm wood interior and retro retail fixtures such as a nut display that seems strangely familiar. It’s also remarkably cyclist-friendly — Keith was able to make use of a communal floor pump to fill his tire — and there’s plenty of bicycle parking.]]> <![CDATA[A diner that Jack Reacher would like]]> If Jack Reacher were to ever return to Colorado and wind up in Boulder, I suspect he’d make a beeline for the Parkway Cafe.]]>