<![CDATA[Boulder - Weekly - Restaurant Review]]> <![CDATA[A happy taco discovery]]> Ever since the closing of the carniceria on Boulder's Bluff Street, I've been at loose ends trying to find a suitable substitute venue for bargainpriced, traditional Mexican tacos. Word on the street was that Longmont's El Taco Feliz served up what I was seeking.]]> <![CDATA[Revisiting a revamped classic]]> In some ways the Chautauqua Dining Hall might be to Boulderites what the Statue of Liberty might be to New Yorkers. Sure, you know it’s there, but you may not venture out there that much unless you have out-of-town visitors or are obligated to attend a special event.]]> <![CDATA[Simply satisfying]]> While the menu here consists of straightforward Italian fare, this isn't just another spaghetti and meatballs joint. The most expensive entry is the Steak Florentine, a $25 number consisting of a half-pound filet mignon melded with mushrooms and Alaskan crab.]]> <![CDATA[Pizzeria Locale gives Bay-area pizza a whirl]]> Boulder’s Pizzeria Locale has been in business almost two years, and has solidified its position as a go-to spot for wood-fired, Naples-style pie.]]> <![CDATA[Back to basics]]> Friend John and I first grasped this pizzeria’s attention to detail when my iced tea arrived. It came with a shot glass loaded with opaque liquid, and John likely relished the potential spectacle of me going blotto over lunch.]]> <![CDATA[At your service]]> The food is important, but no matter how great it is, the environment is equally vital to the experience. Happily, they’ve gotten all of it right at Sugarbeet in Longmont.]]> <![CDATA[A classic diner standby still delivers]]> The energetic cooks and servers here are a friendly yet efficient lot, and the menu holds few surprises for a breakfast and lunch joint. Offerings include a full complement of egg dishes ranging from single egg, bacon and toast kids specials for $4 to $8 jumbosized helpings of huevos rancheros.]]> <![CDATA[Harold’s is a cut above]]> Attached to Longmont’s Plaza Hotel, Harold’s Restaurant & Lounge ups the ante on this town’s fine dining with retro-styled cocktails and original farm-to-table preparations.]]> <![CDATA[An alternative to the Indian buffet]]> Curry N Kebob fills a unique niche among Indian eateries by not featuring the ubiquitous buffet. Most options here cost a buck or two less than typical all-you-can-eat offerings, and service is reasonably fast, permitting those pressed for time to enjoy a subcontinental lunch.]]> <![CDATA[The tastes of Provence and beyond]]> Inside Mateo, tastefully refined earth tones and bright whites make for an elegant-yet-welcoming setting such as one might find in a gallery staffed by friendly, unpretentious folks.]]> <![CDATA[Stars from the ’50s]]> A few years back, a California chain, Ruby’s, attempted to create a ’50s retro diner at Boulder’s Twenty Ninth Street. This space was recently resurrected as a retro eatery under local ownership and a new moniker, the StarLite Diner and Lounge. Like its predecessor, the ambience suggests a trip back in time, with plenty of vinyl banquettes and neon accented by cruiser bicycles and soaked in a golden oldies soundtrack.]]> <![CDATA[Basta’s brunch among the best]]> Once known as Pizzeria Basta, the Boulder eatery now simply known as Basta still serves savory wood oven pies. But this name change more accurately reflects a menu offering much more than just pizza, which is a smart move.]]> <![CDATA[Snap judgment]]> At first glance, Casa Alvarez might as well be decorated exclusively in red flags. It occupies the back corner location of a 30th Street strip mall and has an interior that looks like every Mexican restaurant in every town, with light pastel coloring and tile, overly harsh lighting and awkward attempts to recreate a jungle atmosphere inside.]]> <![CDATA[Getting dizzy on Boulder’s newest donuts]]> I fed Mara donuts until she wept. Well, not really, although we certainly did a fine job of indulging ourselves at Dizzy’s Donuts, Boulder’s newest venue serving fresh takes on old-school baked goods.]]> <![CDATA[Leenie’s Southern Cafe is a bit more cafe than Southern]]> Leenie’s leans more toward being a Southern-influenced diner than it does a full-blown Southern cafe.]]> <![CDATA[Best of the rest]]> Blooming Beets is lifestyle eating if anything, no different in principle than the hip pizza joint or the restaurant that serves the same chow for twice the price as the corner diner just by adding a white table cloth.]]> <![CDATA[No furry blue puppets, just good Korean]]> Exploring the basement food court on University Hill, I recently encountered an eatery with the unlikely moniker of Goody Monster. I was mildly disappointed to discover that the person behind the counter wasn’t a furry blue puppet with ping-pong ball eyes.]]> <![CDATA[Spice China]]> <![CDATA[Open mouth, insert wing]]> REO Speedwagon’s Hi Infidelity, the first season of Miami Vice and the John Madden-era Oakland Raiders are among my myriad of guilty pleasures. Chicken wings come close to making this list. However, many versions, either prepared indifferently or adhering too faithfully to the vinegary tones of the original Buffalo version, inevitably disappoint. For this reason, they have yet to reach the exalted status of a guilty pleasure.]]> <![CDATA[A farmhouse kitchen and pub]]> This new self-styled farmhouse kitchen and pub distinguishes itself by offering locavore small plates as well as a relatively affordable prix fixe menu spotlighting ingredients from Chef Eric Skokan’s farm.]]>