<![CDATA[Boulder - Weekly - Restaurant Review]]> <![CDATA[Improved decor, and the taste to match]]> My friend Auden was visiting from the Western Slope, and it’s customary for us to visit an Asian eatery, since decent ones are mighty scarce in his neck of the woods. To be frank, things didn’t go so well the last go-around. Attempting to prove our foodie street cred to one another, we’d gone to a Vietnamese restaurant and ordered congealed blood cube soup. Each of us tried to be hospitable by insisting that the other polish off this delicacy, but ultimately, much of the bowl remained unfinished. This time, I decided to play it safe by suggesting a visit to Boulder’s Korea House, located on 28th Street and Glenwood Drive. ]]> <![CDATA[A kitchen that deserves the hype]]> The clean setting is set off by high ceilings and an airy feel that evokes a sunny European bistro. If you were a location scout picking a Boulder filming venue for a rom-com starring Julia Roberts (as opposed to Seth Rogen), this would be the spot.]]> <![CDATA[Best of the rest]]> Blooming Beets is lifestyle eating if anything, no different in principle than the hip pizza joint or the restaurant that serves the same chow for twice the price as the corner diner just by adding a white table cloth.]]> <![CDATA[Leenie’s Southern Cafe is a bit more cafe than Southern]]> Leenie’s leans more toward being a Southern-influenced diner than it does a full-blown Southern cafe.]]> <![CDATA[The frontier]]> Boulder’s strict growth boundaries make heading north on Broadway a bit of a cliffdrop, with the city ending abruptly as the street y’s into U.S. 36. But nestled right up against the edge is a restaurant that would be as at home in the urban core as it is on the fringes: The North End at 4580.]]> <![CDATA[Burgers and shakes with style]]> I used to mess with my friend Andrew by feeding him false reports that a popular burger and milkshake chain had set up shop in Colorado. As it turns out, that chain now does have a Denver-area outpost, but it’s far enough away to require advanced planning, and who wants to deal with that?]]> <![CDATA[Shine on]]> When I first heard the name of Boulder’s new eatery Shine, I was hoping it would feature entertainment by a troubled pianist portrayed by actor Geoffrey Rush. Alas, Shine appears more to refer to notions of maximized self-actualization than David Helfgott, although music is on the menu. The latest venture from the Emich triplets, this gathering space, bar and restaurant is just a few doors down from their former establishment, Trilogy.]]> <![CDATA[Experiencing Boulder Baked]]> Open from four in the afternoon until midnight, Boulder Baked is a no-frills joint, with at-the-counter ordering and a slightly funky feel. It's also centrally located on Broadway in the heart of downtown.]]> <![CDATA[A high-end food court]]> Neither good food nor subtlety was a strong suit at the busy suburban mall food courts of my youth. In those pre-Sbarro years, kitsch was king. Over-the-top Union Jack displays heralded the fish and chips stand, and garish, if not stereotypical, lanterns and kimonos indicated where greasy tempura was dished out.]]> <![CDATA[How to mingle]]> The reuben was pleasant; nothing overbearing in it, nothing too quiet. The bread was undertoasted and it was short on rye, but it held up remarkably well given a healthy amount of cole slaw (which replaced the traditional sauerkraut) and Thousand Island dressing.]]> <![CDATA[Going off campus]]> The location seems a bit out there, but Off Campus Cafe was there when we needed it. It was breakfast time on a recent Saturday morning. In Boulder, Lucky’s Café was four parties deep on the clipboard; Walnut Café was so flooded we got back in the car as soon as we got out; and the Village Coffee Shop had a line so long we just scoffed and drove right past it.]]> <![CDATA[A fresh memory]]> The best food transports you. Where Volta transports you is to a long, green lawn on the side of a lake for a reunion of friends and family on a late spring day. You can smell it — in the drink and in the food, and in that place in your mind where the senses create memories, there are herbs and wine and warm air.]]> <![CDATA[The re-creation of fun]]> The coleslaw was good. No, the coleslaw was great. The cabbage was crispy and fresh, lathered in sweet, creamy dressing that tasted like watermelon. They’d added some juice or vinegar into the coleslaw, and it was refreshing in the unseasonable warmth we’ve been getting.]]> <![CDATA[Hiding in plain sight]]> Whether you like it or not, there is a perception outside of Colorado that steakhouses abound in this state. The assumption is that cattle farms abound out here, and that meat from top Angus and Kobe beef farms throughout the West is shipped to a bevy of hungry consumers at any number of steakhouses along the Front Range.]]> <![CDATA[Over the forest, through the woods]]> Winding up snowy Coal Creek Canyon on the winter solstice, I’m gripping the wheel like my Dad in traffic on Christmas Eve trying to get to my grandparents’ house before he implodes.]]> <![CDATA[Upscale Mexican street food]]> One of my pet peeves is the eatery that appropriates inexpensive ethnic food and gussies it up beyond recognition with little resulting benefit. Adding insult to injury is the establishment that jacks up the prices on affordable chow to something approximating the cost of a taco truck rather than the taco itself.]]> <![CDATA[Empire's main dishes deliver]]> Over the past few years, downtown Louisville’s dining options have grown impressively, and the Empire Restaurant and Lounge is one of this burg’s top spots for fine dining in a relaxed setting. While this space can accommodate many diners, it feels smaller and more intimate than it is, enhanced by woods and an earthy color scheme.]]> <![CDATA[Master of one]]> One business is the phenomenal bakery. Every morning, fresh dough is raised in the oven in a large industrial baker’s kitchen. The loaves — batard, olive and sage, focaccia, ciabatta — are arranged on a glass-covered shelf near the entryway. To the right are piles of croissants, popovers, muffins and more.]]> <![CDATA[The water’s fine]]> One thing every diner needs in their toolkit is good, simple Asian food. Not simple in the sense that it’s of poor quality, but simple in the sense that it isn’t decorated to death, to the point of terminal tackiness. Just something approachably tasteful, and tasty.]]> <![CDATA[Looking good]]> It was the store that launched a thousand fashion blogs. Seemed that way, at least. Anthropologie. A women’s clothing store that taps into the area between fashion school and art school, selling unique clothing and lifestyle doo-dads.]]>