<![CDATA[Boulder - Weekly - Boulder Weekly Beer Tour]]> <![CDATA[Why breweries shouldn't make Super Bowl bets]]> After a drubbing so severe that Comedy Central’s Jon Stewart called it “the Seahawks ‘bring a Bronco to work day,’’’ Downtown Boulder’s West Flanders Brewing has to make good on the Super Bowl bet it made with Seattle’s Elysian Brewing.]]> <![CDATA[Classic refreshment]]> When the stars of the tennis world battled it out on the courts of Wimbledon a few weeks ago, viewers not only be turned their heads left and right following the action on the court, but up and down as well, as gallons upon gallons of Pimm’s No. 1 Cups were thrown back in the stands and at home.]]> <![CDATA[All together now]]> In Northeast Ohio, where I’m from, Great Lakes Brewing Company is pretty much the beginning and the end of the craft beer conversation.]]> <![CDATA[Over a barrel]]> Sam Green of Boulder Beer would love to make sure everyone got to taste the brewery’s wine barrel-aged beers, Xena Warrior Princess and Patchouka Sunrise. He really would. But it’s just not that easy anymore. “Those were extremely popular when we released them at the [Great American Beer Festival],” says Green.]]> <![CDATA[Mastering the craft]]> As I pulled up to City Star Brewing, under heavy clouds and light rain on an early Friday morning, people were out hanging their flags, running their errands and opening the many small businesses that line the center of town. This town’s pride and character persisted as I entered the brewery.]]> <![CDATA[Boulder Weekly beer tour]]> A proposal in the state legislature from Rep. Crisanta Duran (D-Denver) to allow municipalities to extend bar hours to as late as 4:30 a.m. was withdrawn by Duran herself.]]> <![CDATA[Boulder Beer turns 35]]> Between wacky recipes, oddball marketing and all manner of shenaniganry, it isn’t just the alcohol that makes the corporate identity of most breweries seem fairly adolescent. But can you blame ‘em? It’s not quite The Children of the Corn, but only a handful of breweries are out of their teens. The elder statesman of Colorado breweries, Boulder Beer, is only 35. And barely 35 at that. Its birthday is this weekend.]]> <![CDATA[Fate Brewing Company floats a summer special]]> Many breweries are ushering in the season with lighter summer fare, like Boulder Beer’s Hoopla, their dry-hopped festival beer. Others are planning to celebrate the season with one-off events like Avery’s Four on the Fourth 4K race, in which runners can compete before enjoying beer and breakfast burritos.]]> <![CDATA[Summer of suds]]> Boulder County’s craft beer explosion isn’t done yet — or that’s the assumption for the owners of a new wave of breweries-in-planning that are shooting to open this year. We count at least eight breweries that have made some degree of progress toward opening.]]> <![CDATA[Extra special]]> West Flanders is in this bold new group of breweries that’s making a specialty out of a particular style. While the recent addition to Boulder’s beer scene does produce an IPA, a stout, a pale ale and a few other standards, it’s all about the Belgians here. When we stop by for a Monday lunch, there are four Belgian styles on tap, along with actual Belgians from actual Belgium in bottles and on a guest tap.]]> <![CDATA[D-Day at The Post Brewing Company]]> The official concept for The Post is simple: “beer and chicken.” Buckets and buckets of chicken.]]> <![CDATA[Looking for a wine list bargain?]]> One recent Saturday morning, a friend sent me the wine list for Green Zebra, one of Chicago’s top vegetarian restaurants, and asked for my advice. He was dining there that evening with friends who enjoyed wine but weren’t obsessive about it. So he would be tasked with ordering for the table.]]> <![CDATA[A new wine frontier emerges]]> Finger Lakes’ wine pioneer Hermann Wiemer released his first wine 35 years ago. While his wines helped the New York region gain critical acclaim, he never curried much favor with local winemakers. And he had little patience for collegiality. In a 1985 interview with the New York Times, he described most Finger Lakes wine as “rubber hose” quality. ]]> <![CDATA[Drinking pink]]> As a kid, I was aware that a pink wine called white zinfandel existed, but my dad considered it crap. That memory lasted well into my adulthood: Don’t buy pink wine because it’s garbage. Fast forward to five years ago or so, and you’ll find entire rows of rosť in liquor stores and a deep craving for it by wine enthusiasts as we approach summer.]]> <![CDATA[Whiskey straight up]]> Whiskey, the spirit that fueled the Wild West, is hot again, with global sales topping $3 billion last year, creating a run on all styles of the spirit. Fortunately for Coloradans, distillers are popping up across the state creating their own unique versions of this American staple and helping fill demand across the Rockies.]]> <![CDATA[Crossfaders]]> Colorado is blazing the trail as the state works to set the standards for legal marijuana use in America. As the first state to roll out legal pot, Colorado is now under a magnifying glass as we create laws to deal with recreational use of what was once an illegal drug.]]> <![CDATA[Arvada ales]]> I’ve been going solo recently for the beer tour, because we’ve wrapped up Boulder County and nobody else on this staff has the journalistic integrity to drive 20 minutes to drink beer.]]> <![CDATA[Brewed for summer]]> For those of us looking to scratch that itch for a new spring and summer brew that isn’t bogged down by sweetness or fruit, the wait is over. Upslope Brewing Company has rereleased their limited summertime-only brew they call the Thai Style White IPA.]]> <![CDATA[Vapor Distillery is going big time]]> Boulder County lost one of its most highly decorated distilleries at the beginning of April, and that is a good thing. Roundhouse Spirits, distilling since 2008, has ceased to exist due to naming rights for their products and overall company. But don’t despair, because in its place is Vapor Distillery, and things are about to get bigger and better.]]> <![CDATA[Celebrate a local favorite]]> Hop lovers rejoice; there is a festival highlighting those bitter, intense beers you know and love. Boulder’s JUL-IPA brings together more than 30 breweries, both locally and nationally based, to pour India Pale Ales for your drinking pleasure.]]>