<![CDATA[Boulder - Weekly - Boulder Weekly Beer Tour]]> <![CDATA[In with the old]]> At a recent wine tasting in Boulder, there was a rarity being poured. We were all assured of it. The wine was made from 100 percent bobal grapes, a red varietal that is rarely seen in the U.S. on its own and is often used in blends.]]> <![CDATA[Maptastic]]> The newly- 21ers out there may not believe it, but there was once a time when those of us aged more than 25 years — you know, “old farts” — didn’t have a fully interactive, voiceactivated GPS in our pocket at all times.]]> <![CDATA[Stout Month and beyond]]> Also going down at Avery this week is All You Need is a Beer, a paired beer and chocolate tasteapalooza that will include no shortage of yakking about the history, culture and “health benefits” of chocobooze combos.]]> <![CDATA[Much ado about poison]]> In late March, two couples filed a class-action lawsuit in California alleging that some of the nation’s top-selling low-cost wines contain unsafe levels of arsenic. “Just a glass or two” of wine from producers like Cupcake, Charles Shaw, Franzia, Rex Goliath and Korbel “could result in dangerous arsenic toxicity,” according to the suit.]]> <![CDATA[Saddle up for a trip to Boulder's newest taproom]]> Louisville is the newest outer province of Russia, if new Louisville brewery Crystal Springs Brewing is any indication. Crystal Springs brews a Russian imperial stout, Black Saddle, along with about a dozen other beers at any given time.]]> <![CDATA[’Ello gov’nor]]> Crossing into the dim, lantern-lit interior of the Bull & Bush Pub & Brewery is like stepping back in time.]]> <![CDATA[This hat is money]]> At face value, the Bourbon and Bacon Fest, which was held at the McNichols Civic Center in Denver on a late January Saturday afternoon, is what shows up in the dream catcher. It’s two hours of unlimited samples of about 50 bourbons, and variations on bacon ranging from pulled pork belly to bacon cupcakes to bacon pizza.]]> <![CDATA[beer tour]]> Oskar Blues is debuting the first ever American-made nitro craft beer in a can, called Old Chub Nitro Scotch Ale, during the upcoming Craft Brewers Conference in Denver on April 8.]]> <![CDATA[Anatomy of a collaboration]]> Let’s put a pair of leather chaps in the mash, or cactus or tumbleweed.” That was the first idea Jason Buehler, head brewer of Oskar Blues in Lyons, had for Hi*Beams Honky Tonk Ale, a collaboration beer made not with another brewery, but a honky tonk band.]]> <![CDATA[Barley, hops and gluten]]> Gluten is a protein in some grains, like wheat and barley, commonly used in pasta, bread and, yes, beer. Gluten-free diets started because of Celiac disease, a serious condition in which people can’t tolerate gluten. Currently, 1 in 133 people have Celiac and 7 percent of people report having non-Celiac sensitivity.]]> <![CDATA[Colorado Craft Beer Week]]> The real, honest, fo’ realsies, no fooling, super-special one and only official Colorado Craft Beer Week runs Friday, March 21, through Saturday, March 29, and it’s packed to the beer-breathing gills with craft-brewed events for you to woot about from atop the most conveniently located 14er.]]> <![CDATA[Cask-conditioned ales: Keeping it real]]> I can remember the feeling, not so long ago, of sitting down at a bar with a decent craft beer selection and being bewildered.]]> <![CDATA[Beer scene out of balance]]> Boulder breweries have a gender problem. From the brewers to the bartenders to the beer drinkers themselves, craft breweries are dominated by males. My estimate on the crowd at Niwot’s Bootstrap Brewing on Jan. 24 was 90 percent male.]]> <![CDATA[Bitchin’ brews]]> This week’s beer tour takes us back to a time when pants could moonlight as parachutes and Frankie asked us to relax. (Full disclosure: I was born in 1985, so I’m not actually qualified to make any statements about life in the ’80s. Without Googling, I couldn’t tell you who Frankie was or why he wanted us to relax.]]> <![CDATA[Every dog has its day]]> As far as drinking buddies go, they don’t come much better than Tobias. He’s always at the bar at SKEYE Brewing in Longmont. As I get deeper into the flight of seven house beers and grow untidy, he’s spilling his drink all over the floor, too. And he doesn’t say a lot but he listens.]]> <![CDATA[Turning green with beer]]> Beer lovers rarely need an excuse to toss back a few pints. But if you’re looking for one, Saint Patrick’s Day (Monday, March 17) generally qualifies. And there’s some decent happenings this week to toast the patron saint of green on green outfits and bad decision making.]]> <![CDATA[D-Day at The Post Brewing Company]]> The official concept for The Post is simple: “beer and chicken.” Buckets and buckets of chicken.]]> <![CDATA[Arvada ales]]> I’ve been going solo recently for the beer tour, because we’ve wrapped up Boulder County and nobody else on this staff has the journalistic integrity to drive 20 minutes to drink beer.]]> <![CDATA[Time for a session]]> It seems lately like craft beer brewers are borrowing a page from their brethren in big beer: Less is more. While the craft beer revolution has fundamentally transformed brewing in the United States towards producing bigger and bolder flavored beers, lately more brewers are turning out lessrobust “session” beers, much to their consumers delight.]]> <![CDATA[Over a barrel]]> Sam Green of Boulder Beer would love to make sure everyone got to taste the brewery’s wine barrel-aged beers, Xena Warrior Princess and Patchouka Sunrise. He really would. But it’s just not that easy anymore. “Those were extremely popular when we released them at the [Great American Beer Festival],” says Green.]]>