<![CDATA[Boulder - Weekly - Boulder Weekly Beer Tour]]> <![CDATA[Straight from the brewer’s mouth]]> In the summertime, people drink more beer, and we drink more session beers. Session beers could be any style, but have relatively low alcohol (usually around or below 5 percent ABV), and therefore, they make it easy to toss back a few. Many of our local breweries have been kind enough to offer up session beers for us to sip on all summer long.]]> <![CDATA[Sharing is caring]]> For better or worse, we live in a culture of sharing. We share our photos, our statuses, our relationship highs and lows, favorite recipes, workouts, selfies, DIY projects and even our meals. The rise of the Internet tapped into our innately social mindset, lit a fuse under it and exploded it across our screens for all to see. It’s no surprise the sharing mentality would eventually permeate our lives offline, as well.]]> <![CDATA[Tiny bubbles]]> It’s easy enough to name the most obvious trends in Boulder County brewing. Three breweries are planning to open this summer in Lafayette; Boulder loves beer that’s heavy on the hops; barrel-aging is big.]]> <![CDATA[Make it stop]]> Saturday morning in Boulder. Your eyes are bloodshot. Your mouth tastes like the venue. When you try to stand up, it feels like food poisoning on a ship in bad weather. But you promised yourself you wouldn’t waste this Saturday, given last weekend’s take out-and-Netflix-filled bacchanal.]]> <![CDATA[Celebrate a local favorite]]> Hop lovers rejoice; there is a festival highlighting those bitter, intense beers you know and love. Boulder’s JUL-IPA brings together more than 30 breweries, both locally and nationally based, to pour India Pale Ales for your drinking pleasure.]]> <![CDATA[Winter’s miracle cocktail]]> Flying 2,000 miles across the country back into Denver on Monday, I started to sniffle. Maybe it was the recycled air of the airplane, or the holiday snot-wipings from my three-year-old niece, but warmth and stuffiness were rising somewhere in my respiratory system, like tacky pink insulation getting shot between walls.]]> <![CDATA[Ale Satan]]> Boulder, Boulder, Boulder. You have a lot of catching up to do. Yes, even in craft brewing.]]> <![CDATA[Going hopless]]> Even on the last leg of our Boulder County beer tour — a trip up to Nederland to visit both Wild Mountain and Very Nice breweries — we’re learning something new, courtesy of Very Nice co-owner Susan Green.]]> <![CDATA[Colorado’s beer scene is getting crowded]]> When Upslope brewing opened its doors in 2008, it was the first new brewery in Boulder in over a decade. Its approach was simple: wellcrafted approachable beer served in cans; the labels simply stated the style: pale ale, IPA, craft lager, etc.]]> <![CDATA[Fate Brewing Company floats a summer special]]> Many breweries are ushering in the season with lighter summer fare, like Boulder Beer’s Hoopla, their dry-hopped festival beer. Others are planning to celebrate the season with one-off events like Avery’s Four on the Fourth 4K race, in which runners can compete before enjoying beer and breakfast burritos.]]> <![CDATA[Craft Sabbath]]> Beer and heavy metal are pretty obvious bedfellows. When one pictures the average headbanger, there’s usually a tall boy in his or her hand. While wine and spirits often have a pretentious veneer around them, beer is refreshing, satisfying and cures what ails you.]]> <![CDATA[Anatomy of a collaboration]]> Let’s put a pair of leather chaps in the mash, or cactus or tumbleweed.” That was the first idea Jason Buehler, head brewer of Oskar Blues in Lyons, had for Hi*Beams Honky Tonk Ale, a collaboration beer made not with another brewery, but a honky tonk band.]]> <![CDATA[Bitchin’ brews]]> This week’s beer tour takes us back to a time when pants could moonlight as parachutes and Frankie asked us to relax. (Full disclosure: I was born in 1985, so I’m not actually qualified to make any statements about life in the ’80s. Without Googling, I couldn’t tell you who Frankie was or why he wanted us to relax.]]> <![CDATA[A column about beer]]> Savor, dear readers, the rare industry that doesn’t require constant branding and marketing. There are tons of opportunity for branding in the craft beer industry, of course, but there isn’t a pathological need for it like with cars or cookies or coffee or most everything you can think of.]]> <![CDATA[The great forgotten Italian red]]> Far be it from me to dispute that. I don’t know how, and I’m scared to. But in that due bluster around nebbiolo and sangiovese, and their subsequent products, it’s hard to find on Boulder County menus what some of us hiding over in the corner consider Italy’s finest red: amarone della Valpolicella.]]> <![CDATA[Boulder Weekly beer tour]]> Oskar Blues’ latest venture is, at first glance, a rather odd mash-up: Bikes, tacos and tequila. Oh, and beer, of course. And yet somehow, in OB’s typical Midas touch fashion, it all works.]]> <![CDATA[Much ado about poison]]> In late March, two couples filed a class-action lawsuit in California alleging that some of the nation’s top-selling low-cost wines contain unsafe levels of arsenic. “Just a glass or two” of wine from producers like Cupcake, Charles Shaw, Franzia, Rex Goliath and Korbel “could result in dangerous arsenic toxicity,” according to the suit.]]> <![CDATA[Tour de drink]]> Memorial Day weekend, to many, represents the start of summer. In Boulder and eight other cities, it also means the start of a summer of imbibing all across town with a pocket-sized booklet, or “Passport,” that invites you to explore bars, restaurants, wineries, distilleries and breweries, old and new, downtown and around town.]]> <![CDATA[Saddle up for a trip to Boulder's newest taproom]]> Louisville is the newest outer province of Russia, if new Louisville brewery Crystal Springs Brewing is any indication. Crystal Springs brews a Russian imperial stout, Black Saddle, along with about a dozen other beers at any given time.]]> <![CDATA[Drinking pink]]> As a kid, I was aware that a pink wine called white zinfandel existed, but my dad considered it crap. That memory lasted well into my adulthood: Don’t buy pink wine because it’s garbage. Fast forward to five years ago or so, and you’ll find entire rows of rosť in liquor stores and a deep craving for it by wine enthusiasts as we approach summer.]]>