<![CDATA[Boulder - Weekly - Boulder Weekly Beer Tour]]> <![CDATA[A drink to celebrate]]> The lore is that the sazerac is the oldest American cocktail. The story goes that in the mid-1800s, the owner of the Merchant Exchange Coffee House in New Orleans sold the place to start importing liquor. One of his imports was a cognac called Sazerac-de- Forge et Fils.]]> <![CDATA[This hat is money]]> At face value, the Bourbon and Bacon Fest, which was held at the McNichols Civic Center in Denver on a late January Saturday afternoon, is what shows up in the dream catcher. It’s two hours of unlimited samples of about 50 bourbons, and variations on bacon ranging from pulled pork belly to bacon cupcakes to bacon pizza.]]> <![CDATA[Sports and wine]]> Two of the beer company’s commercials were widely praised. Bud Light’s spot made virtually every viewer hope for an epic evening in a life-sized Pac-Man maze. Budweiser’s tale of a lost puppy finding his way home melted millions of hearts.]]> <![CDATA[Rest easy, wine lovers]]> A few years ago, Adrian North, a psychology professor at Heriot-Watt University in Scotland, tested the impact of music on taste perception by pouring wine for 250 students.]]> <![CDATA[Much ado about poison]]> In late March, two couples filed a class-action lawsuit in California alleging that some of the nation’s top-selling low-cost wines contain unsafe levels of arsenic. “Just a glass or two” of wine from producers like Cupcake, Charles Shaw, Franzia, Rex Goliath and Korbel “could result in dangerous arsenic toxicity,” according to the suit.]]> <![CDATA[Extra special]]> West Flanders is in this bold new group of breweries that’s making a specialty out of a particular style. While the recent addition to Boulder’s beer scene does produce an IPA, a stout, a pale ale and a few other standards, it’s all about the Belgians here. When we stop by for a Monday lunch, there are four Belgian styles on tap, along with actual Belgians from actual Belgium in bottles and on a guest tap.]]> <![CDATA[The beer battles]]> There’s a lot of sharing on our beer tour. When I describe six of a brewery’s beers in this column, I didn’t order six beers. I just brought five people. We pass everything around, and even trade or give away beers we don’t care for.]]> <![CDATA[Crafty crafting]]> “If you’re gonna do it, you do it right,” Huber says at one point in the tour of the brewery. It’s a theme that Kettle & Stone seems dedicated to.]]> <![CDATA[Ale Satan]]> Boulder, Boulder, Boulder. You have a lot of catching up to do. Yes, even in craft brewing.]]> <![CDATA[Pucker up]]> Recently, New Belgium Brewing in Fort Collins added Snapshot to their year-round lineup, which is billed as a citrusy and tart wheat beer. Although not listed on the bottle, Snapshot utilizes a mixed-fermentation which includes lactobacillus (a yeast strain which can impart “tart,” “sour,” and “barnyard” characteristics). As far as sours go, Snapshot is quite tame compared to some of its mouth-puckering counterparts.]]> <![CDATA[Old school]]> Everything old is new again, including ancient herbal beers regaining popularity in the craft beer world after about a 250-year hiatus. They’re called gruits, which refers to a mixture of oldfashioned herbs and spices used to bitter and flavor beer prior to the prevalence of hops (although hops began being used in gruits around the second century).]]> <![CDATA[American agave]]> Tatanka is an American alternative to Mexican tequila, which uses the fermented sap of the agave plant. Agave — a large succulent not to be confused as a type of cactus — is similar in appearance to aloe with its long, flat leaves covered in spines. Blue weber agave, or Agave tequilana, is responsible for the production of tequila.]]> <![CDATA[Holiday beer guide]]> Why is it that most holiday beers are as dark as the early nights of winter, contain warming spices and have alcohol levels approaching that of wine? It’s likely because these complex-flavored beers pair well with the heavy meals and endless desserts we enjoy around the holidays.]]> <![CDATA[New beard-themed brewery in Longmont]]> On a below-freezing Tuesday evening, half of the taproom at Großen (pronounced ‘grossen’) can-shaped glasses adorned with your pictures of various facial hair styles and sampler trays in the shape of mustaches.]]> <![CDATA[At Longmont's Oskar Blues, a malty mea culpa]]> I am sorry for not liking Oskar Blues. I am sorry to you, the reader, and to the beer itself.]]> <![CDATA[beer tour]]> Oskar Blues is debuting the first ever American-made nitro craft beer in a can, called Old Chub Nitro Scotch Ale, during the upcoming Craft Brewers Conference in Denver on April 8.]]> <![CDATA[Anatomy of a collaboration]]> Let’s put a pair of leather chaps in the mash, or cactus or tumbleweed.” That was the first idea Jason Buehler, head brewer of Oskar Blues in Lyons, had for Hi*Beams Honky Tonk Ale, a collaboration beer made not with another brewery, but a honky tonk band.]]> <![CDATA[Farewell, Planet Porter]]> Fare thee well, sweet Planet Porter. But when one brave soldier falls by the wayside, others arise to take its place. Here are some of the most interesting beers being released at local breweries this week or this week adjacent.]]> <![CDATA[Pumpkin beer is here]]> Pumpkin ales are as highly anticipated as any seasonal beer, neck-and-neck with Christmas ales. But it’s a style fraught with problems.]]> <![CDATA[Football, beer and construction]]> But seriously Mr. Manning, with a Colorado/ Washington matchup coming only months after pot legalization in both states, we’re going to have to change up the nature of the “Bud Bowl,” for this year. Get with the program.]]>