<![CDATA[Boulder - Weekly - Special Editions]]> <![CDATA[The rise (and fall) of developmental toxins]]> Recent research has made the public acutely aware of the growing list of commonly used industrial chemicals that are known to interfere with the human hormonal system. Like the Boulder Baby Company, many businesses across the country have shifted their business models to develop natural products that seek to create a toxic-free environment for kids.]]> <![CDATA[Space for change: Coworking spaces sustain entrepreneurial community]]> Coworking spaces are not your typical offices. You won’t find any cubicles and there are no bosses. A mobile application developer might work at the same table as a natural foods marketer, both sharing one common denominator: a sense of a professional community.]]> <![CDATA[Satiate hunger with fresh ideas]]> When the cool Colorado dawn gives way to blazing sunlight, farmers across our state are already hard at work preparing the evening meal.]]> <![CDATA[The artist in everyone, anywhere, from anything]]> Talk to El Anatsui about the thousands of bottlecaps used in his artwork, and he’s less concerned with the obvious problem — yes, these were garbage headed for landfills that now hang on museum walls — than the issue they represent for his community.]]> <![CDATA[Hemp Industry Overview]]> What if we just woke up one day and corn was outlawed?” asks Eric Hunter, president of the Rocky Mountain Hemp Association. “Imagine if 80 years down the road corn was illegal. There go chips, corn syrup, plastic cups.]]> <![CDATA[Making it rain]]> It’s a practice that was used for thousands of years, but with the development of sewage systems and chemical fertilizer, the practice of recycling urine and using it as fertilizer went by the way side. Recently, this old practice gained new momentum in the U.]]> <![CDATA[Reinventing the toilet]]> Karl Linden and his research team are not reinventing the wheel, but they are trying to reinvent the toilet. It began several years ago for Linden, a professor of environmental engineering at the University of Colorado Boulder, in a class he taught about water sanitation and hygiene. He gave a short assignment about potential global health initiatives.]]> <![CDATA[Imbalance persists in county economy]]> While Boulder County is a “community of wealth,” in the words of Morgan McMillan, some statistical trends indicate that could gradually change. McMillan is the civic forum director for The Community Foundation, a Boulder-based non-profit dedicated to preparing the county for its future and encouraging charitable giving.]]> <![CDATA[New hydropower could ease transition from fossil fuels]]> If you’ve ever spent time around one of Colorado’s rivers or streams during spring and summer runoff, you’ve had a taste of nature at its best. Supercharged, ionized air, forest and wildflowers, and, above all, massive torrents of water sweeping from the high Rockies out into the plains, or through sandstone canyons toward the distant Pacific.]]> <![CDATA[Float tank therapy]]> Float Tank Therapy is an evolution of principals first espoused by neuro-psychiatrist John C. Lilly. He sought to create an environment that reduced as much sensory input as possible to unburden the mind from the constant stimulation that must be filtered in order to function. In 1954 he created his first isolation tanks.]]> <![CDATA[Green your grill]]> It’s a tradition that’s quintessential to summer. It just doesn’t quite feel like summer until you’ve tossed a few burgers (maybe a couple portabella caps for the veggie crowd) on the grill, a cold beer in one hand and tongs in the other. But few of us ever stop to think about the environmental impact of our summer barbeques.]]> <![CDATA[The dirt on reusing soil]]> In places where winters can get harsh — and there will be at least a couple of harsh winter weeks here on the Front Range — soil will expand and contract, so a mindful gardener will want to empty plastic, ceramic or clay containers to prevent them from cracking.]]> <![CDATA[Speeding toward fitness]]> "A seven-minute workout can be efficacious,” says Glen Cordoza, co-author of Power Speed Endurance: A Skill-Based Approach to Endurance Training, a book detailing Crossfit founder and triathlon coach Brian MacKenzie’s revolutionary short, intense approach to training.]]> <![CDATA[Peak fitness]]> If you haven’t been to high altitudes in a while, you will likely feel the effects of the thin air. Serious health issues, including High Altitude Cerebral Edema (HACE) and High Altitude Pulmonary Edema (HAPE) can occur as low as 6,000 feet, but for the majority of Colorado residents, should not be an issue. However, Acute Mountain Sickness (AMS) is an issue, which is why you should take steps to prepare for high altitude hikes.]]> <![CDATA[A community mission]]> Boulder’s first food co-op, The Second Kitchen, is trying to make a bigger difference when it comes to quality and sustainability of food distribution, while not forgetting their humble beginnings. The organization’s name is a tribute to those humble begins, when co-founder Sara Brody once used the second kitchen of her duplex to house large sacks of grains and other products for it’s first few years as a buy-in club.]]> <![CDATA[Yoga for the common folk]]> Tabitha Farrar places her hands and feet on her mat in the downward-facing dog position and releases a deep breath. When her face appears again, a smile breaks out. Her co-worker and, for the moment, yoga classmate, is squirming next to her while Ted Nugent plays in the background and the sound of glasses clinking and laughing rings out from the brewery bar in the next room.]]> <![CDATA[The pros and cons of industrial-scale solar]]> It’s an undeniably gruesome image: A bird soars over the Mojave desert, and suddenly, revoltingly, catches fire, streaks momentarily like a small meteor, and then seems to disappear, leaving only smoke. Seen from afar, some are calling them “streamers.]]> <![CDATA[Soot on snow]]> The duo of snowmobiles has climbed to over 6,000 feet elevation, halfway to the study site where researcher Susan Kaspari and her small team will dig into six feet of snow and sample for soot, more accurately known as black carbon.]]> <![CDATA[Organic online]]> <![CDATA[Full backpacks, full stomachs]]> As the temperature drops and the leaves change color, kids around the nation get back into the swing of school. For some students it means little more than early mornings and evenings lost to homework, but for others, it means knowing they won’t go home hungry — at least during the week.]]>