<![CDATA[Boulder - Weekly - Special Editions]]> <![CDATA[Recipes on the range]]> As spring arrives, most foodies’ thoughts turn to the local produce making its way to area farmers’ markets. To help usher in the fresh produce season, Boulderganic asked three county farms to share a favorite recipe that makes the most of their bounty.]]> <![CDATA[High water and high stakes]]> The flood that hit Colorado in 2013 couldn’t have come at a worse time for many farmers. In the middle of September, many fruits and vegetables are near ripe and ready for harvest, leaving them vulnerable to damage from flood waters and the pollutants in the water. Some farms had to declare the 2013 harvest a total loss.]]> <![CDATA[Fish food]]> The Aquaponic Source, a company based out of Longmont, hopes to increase the number of aquaponic systems being used in classrooms across that nation with their new Grants for Plants Foundation, but some Boulder County students are already reaping the benefits.]]> <![CDATA[Hemp: The fiber side of cannabis]]> While marijuana advocates celebrated the success of Amendment 64 in the November election, other cannabis aficionados began focusing on something new: farming hemp legally.]]> <![CDATA[Full backpacks, full stomachs]]> As the temperature drops and the leaves change color, kids around the nation get back into the swing of school. For some students it means little more than early mornings and evenings lost to homework, but for others, it means knowing they won’t go home hungry — at least during the week.]]> <![CDATA[How to make your own kombucha]]> More than 2,000 years ago, the ancient Chinese considered kombucha an immortal health elixir. Some avid drinkers of the fermented tea beverage might say just the same today.]]> <![CDATA[Peak fitness]]> If you haven’t been to high altitudes in a while, you will likely feel the effects of the thin air. Serious health issues, including High Altitude Cerebral Edema (HACE) and High Altitude Pulmonary Edema (HAPE) can occur as low as 6,000 feet, but for the majority of Colorado residents, should not be an issue. However, Acute Mountain Sickness (AMS) is an issue, which is why you should take steps to prepare for high altitude hikes.]]> <![CDATA[One man’s trash is another man’s business venture]]> Northeast of Denver in the small town of Hudson lies the largest tire dump in the U.S., known by many as Tire Mountain. Immediately south of Colorado Springs sits the nation’s second largest tire dump. Combined, the Rubber Manufacturing Association says, Colorado’s tire dumps, known as monofills, accounted for 40 percent of the nation’s waste tires in 2011 — an estimated 60 million tires.]]> <![CDATA[Profile of a sustainability hub]]> It’s been 10 years since the Alliance Center took up residence as a multitenant co-working space on Wynkoop Street in Denver; grassroots powerhouses like Conservation Colorado have anchored the center since it opened its doors in 2004. But this August, it emerged from eight months of multimillion-dollar renovation as a true bastion of sustainability.]]> <![CDATA[Imbalance persists in county economy]]> While Boulder County is a “community of wealth,” in the words of Morgan McMillan, some statistical trends indicate that could gradually change. McMillan is the civic forum director for The Community Foundation, a Boulder-based non-profit dedicated to preparing the county for its future and encouraging charitable giving.]]> <![CDATA[Hemp Industry Overview]]> What if we just woke up one day and corn was outlawed?” asks Eric Hunter, president of the Rocky Mountain Hemp Association. “Imagine if 80 years down the road corn was illegal. There go chips, corn syrup, plastic cups.]]> <![CDATA[Zero waste heroes]]> Such plastic purging is slowly catching on in North America as awareness about plastic pollution and negative health effects grows. But for many practitioners, divesting their lifestyles of plastic waste can be challenging — and inconvenient. The Mandersons hope to change that.]]> <![CDATA[A community mission]]> Boulder’s first food co-op, The Second Kitchen, is trying to make a bigger difference when it comes to quality and sustainability of food distribution, while not forgetting their humble beginnings. The organization’s name is a tribute to those humble begins, when co-founder Sara Brody once used the second kitchen of her duplex to house large sacks of grains and other products for it’s first few years as a buy-in club.]]> <![CDATA[The dirt on reusing soil]]> In places where winters can get harsh — and there will be at least a couple of harsh winter weeks here on the Front Range — soil will expand and contract, so a mindful gardener will want to empty plastic, ceramic or clay containers to prevent them from cracking.]]> <![CDATA[Engineering citizens of change]]> Beyond economic prosperity, Boulder’s startup culture also shows a correlation between strong businesses and strong communities as evidenced by such organizations as the Entrepreneurs Foundation of Colorado, a trendsetter for economic community-mindedness that has provided more than $2 million in community funding, benefitting Front Range area nonprofits.]]> <![CDATA[Back to the basics]]> Here in Boulder County, being healthy isn’t a trend, it’s a lifestyle. Between all the biking, hiking and running, Coloradans are managing to remain one of the healthiest states in the nation. Lately, we have been hearing a lot about going back to the basics with all-natural food choices.]]> <![CDATA[The need for seaweed]]> “A robust dose of marine minerals, specifically iodine via the potent variety of sea vegetable, is the most effective way to increase iodine naturally and balance the thyroid,” says Sue Van Raes, a nutritional therapist, health coach and founder of Boulder Nutrition.]]> <![CDATA[Learning in pajamas]]> <![CDATA[The new environmental frontier]]> In Thomas Stoner's book Small Change, Big Gains: Reflections of an Energy Entrepreneur he makes a case for taking the environmental movement to the free market.]]> <![CDATA[The pros and cons of industrial-scale solar]]> It’s an undeniably gruesome image: A bird soars over the Mojave desert, and suddenly, revoltingly, catches fire, streaks momentarily like a small meteor, and then seems to disappear, leaving only smoke. Seen from afar, some are calling them “streamers.]]>