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Thursday, April 16,2015

Fighters in the ring

‘One Night in Miami’ invokes a heavyweight conversation on race relations

By Elizabeth Miller
How best do we whittle ourselves into instruments for change? Is it by sharpening our tongues, hardening our fists or sweetening our songs? That’s the question at the heart of One Night in Miami..., which posits the conversations that might have unfolded while boxer Cassius Clay/Muhammad Ali, activist Malcolm X, singer Sam Cooke and football player Jim Brown spent the evening of Feb. 25, 1964 together in a hotel room debating the merits of how, or if, the others addressed the issues at hand in the simmering civil rights movement.
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Thursday, April 16,2015

Good guys gone wrong

Local law enforcement, DA’s office speak to efforts to assist veterans when they have run-ins with the law

By Elizabeth Miller
A soldier eats, sleeps and works all day surrounded by companions who have promised to protect him, people that soldier would die for, and who he has promised to protect at a moment’s notice. “Especially being deployed and being with this core group of people that you’re in a hostile situation with, doing everything with them from sleeping, eating, fighting, using the bathroom — everything — your entire day is based upon that kind of...
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Thursday, April 9,2015

‘Don't tell them there's nothing wrong’

Workman’s compensation doctor says the concerns at Casey go well past the irritation of hydrogen sulfide

By Elizabeth Miller
Hydrogen sulfide may not be the heart of the problem at Casey Middle School, says Dr. Sander Orent, medical director of Arbor Occupational Medicine and the workman’s compensation doctor who has treated the teachers who believe they have health effects from working in the school. Carbon dioxide building up in classrooms due to poor air circulation may be compounding the problem, and increasing the effects of volatile organic compounds and irritants that do exist in the school, he says. The community response shows mounting, not dissipating concern, and Orent says part of that is in how Boulder Valley School District has responded to the questions raised about whether the air quality is safe at Casey.
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Thursday, April 2,2015

Differences of opinion on safety remain for Casey school

Air quality testing and symptoms survey making slow progress

By Elizabeth Miller
In a January email exchange between Rast and Casey Principal Justin McMillan, Rast asked McMillan to confirm that classes were moved, what the readings were on hydrogen sulfide monitors in the areas of the school, where odors were reported that day and whether the principal planned to update parents.
Thursday, March 26,2015

Free-range art

Boulder Arts Week is both about drawing audiences in and bringing art out into the world

By Elizabeth Miller
Somewhere between the cupcakes and the ciabatta, a cluster of singers will belt out love ballads. Watercolor landscape paintings will provide a backdrop to the rods and reels for sale at Front Range Anglers. The tale of Little Red Riding Hood will be retold — for adults — with shadow puppets on the walls of a dance studio.
Thursday, March 19,2015

Dairy Center’s renovations will squeeze Boulder’s performance space options during construction

By Elizabeth Miller
Performing arts companies in Boulder have few options for venues to book within city limits that meet the needs dictated by time, space and cost. Theater companies in town point to The Dairy Center for the Arts as the only real option for a professional production. But with the planned closures of its theatrical performance spaces, the East and the Carson theaters, from January to August 2016, those theater companies won’t just be bumping up against one another trying to fit into limited space for their productions. They’ll be downright homeless.
Thursday, March 19,2015

Alone among a billion

By Elizabeth Miller
He’d gone to music school and continued to play music as a creative outlet while building a career at a software company and supporting a family. Writing didn’t need to be added to the list of things he did with his time, but somehow, it added itself..
Thursday, March 12,2015

Storytelling takes the stage

Local Lab pares down the spectacle to let the raw, experimental core of theater shine through

By Elizabeth Miller
Theater, at its core, is storytelling. It’s a gathering together to hear another’s life story, to see ourselves in those stories in ways that make our own stories make a little more sense and to experience that catharsis as part of an audience. At Local Lab, the three-day festival of new plays, the experience is stripped back to just the stories. Actors read from scripts still in hand. Playwrights take chances and venture experiments they wouldn’t in the presence of New York City’s daunting theater scene.
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Thursday, March 12,2015

Not in this Statehouse

Bill to weaken renewable energy standards came from ALEC

By Elizabeth Miller
The state bill that would have rolled back Colorado’s renewable energy standards to half of their proposed levels was co-sponsored by legislators who have been linked to the fossil fuel-funded American Legislative Exchange Council. The American Legislative Exchange Council (ALEC) describes itself as “the nation’s largest nonpartisan, voluntary membership organization of state legislators. The organization advances limited government, free markets and federalism,” in a letter to Google Chairman Eric Schmidt written in response to his comments on the company’s choice in September to part ways with the organization.
Thursday, March 5,2015

What happens when a son sets out to profile his father?

Documentary reveals the history of far more than a record store

By Elizabeth Miller
The documentary film Old Man is as much a story of a troubled, perhaps marginally dysfunctional family as it is the story of a troubled record store — and, in many ways, a dysfunctional town. The portrait of Boulder is not graceful. It’s a critique of the town’s ability to win both for greatest number of advanced degrees per capita and for high incidence of teen suicide and drug use. That’s the context the film’s director Dan Schneidkraut leans on to make a far more personal story make sense — one that’s about his father, Andy, owner of the Boulder institution Albums on the Hill.
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