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Home » Articles » Entertainment »  Screen
 
Thursday, July 10,2014

Clips of faith

Clips of Faith is making its annual stop in downtown Boulder, showcasing a series of short films made by New Belgium fans and shown in the open-air summer “yeehaw” style while being paired with New Belgium’s most “esoteric,” beer creations. Blood of Thine Enemies Red Ale and an Escargot Porter? Sign us up.
Thursday, July 10,2014

Easy, breezy fun

Nineteen years strong at the Boulder Outdoor Cinema

By Michael J. Casey
Located in the parking lot behind the Boulder Museum of Contemporary Art (BMoCA), BOC celebrated its initial season in 1995 and has been running strong since. Three years ago, Marsh and Fritz purchased the festival from Dave Riepe and Jon Hegeman and oversaw the continuation and.
Thursday, July 3,2014

Not so fast, Rick Santorum

Only fans of choice will choose ‘Obvious Child’

By Ryan Syrek
Donna is a woman without artifice, comfortable telling rooms full of strangers about her flatulence. When her boyfriend, Ryan (Paul Briganti), dumps her, Donna goes on a bender that includes the most uncomfortable stand-up routine not performed by a former Seinfeld.
Thursday, June 26,2014

Freaky Frequency

‘The Signal’ is icky good

By Ryan Syrek
For a movie reviewer, having a favorite genre kinda feels like a parent having a favorite child; oh, they totally do, they’re just not supposed to talk about it. Well, just like your mom told your sister when you were out of earshot, if all other genres were out of the room, I’d totally tell indie sci-fi that it’s my favorite.
Thursday, June 26,2014

Watch

The second annual Front Range Film Festival is going down in Longmont thanks to the Firehouse Art Center. This year’s installment includes an expansion to four different venues that will be playing a total of 12 films throughout the weekend, ranging from stop motion to environmental documentaries.
Thursday, June 19,2014

Sequel, heal thyself

‘22 Jump Street’ cures sequelitis

By Ryan Syrek
Pretend you were excited for the big screen version of 21 Jump Street. Yeah, nobody believes you. Writers Michael Bacall and Jonah Hill teamed up with directors Phil Lord and Christopher Miller for the most hilarious, self-aware adaptation of a Richard Greico television show ever attempted. A sequel was inevitable. Yet somehow this sequel is far better than we deserve.
Thursday, June 12,2014

Control-Z Cruise

‘The Edge of Tomorrow’ doesn’t need an undo button

By Ryan Syrek
Every time Tom Cruise, the greatest modern matinee idol, makes a new movie, everybody rushes to fuse artist and art and spews out some variation of “I just don’t like him anymore.” America’s collective moral stance seems to be that we should never forget that someone belongs to a douchey faith but we should purge memories of other horrid things actors have done, like domestic abuse. Disagree? Tell it to Sean Penn’s two Oscars.
Thursday, June 5,2014

So choose one, Seth

‘A Million Ways to Die in the West’ is vile

By Ryan Syrek
Anna (Charlize Theron) blows into town, she agrees to help Albert win a duel against Louise’s new boyfriend, Foy (Neil Patrick Harris). Of course, she sees the nicety nice niceness of Albert as irresistible and cannot wait to reward him with sex.
Thursday, May 29,2014

It’s a sad business, being funny

Charlie Chaplin’s autobiographical ‘Limelight’

By Michael J. Casey
back on stage. Two performers, one on the way up and one on the way down meet in the middle — typical fare for melodrama, but Chaplin mines the material for something far more serious. A younger Chaplin would have made the movie with more joie de vivre, but reality weighed heavily on Chaplin’s mind.
Thursday, May 22,2014

Atomic blast ‘Godzilla’ is radioactive fun

By Ryan Syrek
The film opens in the late ’90s. Joe Brody (Bryan Cranston) and his wife Sandra (Juliette Binoche) are investigating bizarre seismic readings at the nuclear reactor where they work. Things do not go well. The nuclear station goes kablooey, Sandra is killed and Joe spends the next 15 years trying to get to the bottom of what really happened.
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