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Arts

Arts | Week of March 26, 2015

First Glance/Second Look: Quilts from the Denver Art Museum Collection..

Arts

Look

As part of Month of Photography 2015 and Boulder Arts Week, Boulder Museum of Contemporary Art is hosting Bon Bon, a collaborative exhibit with Kristen Hatgi Sink and Jillian FitzMaurice. This is the first time both artists are teaming up to bring their unique perspectives to a multimedia presentation.

Arts

Arts | Week of March 19, 2015

First Glance/Second Look: Quilts from the Denver Art Museum Collection..

Arts

Arts | Week of March 12, 2015

Denver Art Museum, 100 W. 14th Ave. Parkway, Denver, 720-865- 5000. Through March 15..

Arts

Too good to be true

Photographer fakes, rather than trying to make, the perfect family

By Amanda Moutinho

Suzanne Heintz is notorious for her family photos. She captures the everyday household chores, the family vacations and the holiday festivities. In the photos, Heintz is vibrant and lively, usually with a big smile. In contrast, her husband, Chauncey, seems a bit stiff and her daughter, Mary Margaret, has the same blank stare. That could possibly be because Chauncey and Mary Margaret are mannequins.

Arts

Arts | Week of March 5, 2015

First Glance/Second Look: Quilts from the Denver Art Museum Collection..

Arts

Arts | Week of Feb. 26, 2015

rePOPulated: Contemporary Perspectives on Pop Art..

Arts

Cultural tensions on display

Contemporary Tibetan art exhibit explores changing attitudes

By Devin Blomquist

A massive painting on melted bubble wrap depicts American rock legend, Gene Simmons of Kiss, complete with proverbial white and black face paint and his signature facial expression. The painting hangs to the right of another painting on bubble wrap, this one depicting the manifestation of one of Tibet’s protector deities, Dorge Drakkten.

Arts

Arts | Week of Feb. 19, 2015

Colorado pop artist Phil Bender has spent the last 30 years putting his spin on everday objects. See his work on display at the Arvada Center..

Arts

Not your average stoner

Local artist takes stone balancing to an ‘impossible’ level

By Devin Blomquist

Michael Grab thrives on the impossible. In fact, the professional stone balancer has made the phrase “as impossible as possible” the motto by which he creates. Most of his sculptures, which can often be found among the ripples of Boulder Creek, feature stones of varying shapes, sizes and textures balancing atop one another so methodically, so delicately, it appears as though a single breath could bring them tumbling down.

Books

Words | Week of March 26, 2015

“Walt Whitman Sings” A Spirit Revival in Story and Song..

Books

Poetry

Lost in The Middle of Now Here

Dank P.h.a.r.t. The Pirate Poet (Matt Bovard), is the poetry coordinator for StarWater Magick Productions. Every Wednesday at 303 Vodka Distillery he hosts StarWater Wednesday, a free art event that brings together the best of Boulder’s local art scene..

Books

A story takes flight

Sister trio shares childhood memories in new book

By Devin Blomquist

Whenever the sisters had a problem, whether it be they were afraid of the dark or something had been broken, their grandmother would try to help solve those problems through Mother Eagle stories. A few of their favorite and most memorable childhood tales from their grandmother have become the basis for their new book.

Books

Words | Week of March 19, 2015

“The Tea in Me” from The Best Travel Writing Vol. 10 — by Bill Giebler..

Books

Poetry

Creatures

a lonely bear lumbers through the alley and the raccoons scatter..

Books

A walk on the dark side

Weird? Violent? You’re ready fodder for Dale Bridges’ next book

By Adam Perry

Justice, Inc. is the debut short-story collection by former Boulder Weekly A&E editor Dale Bridges, who left the paper in 2009 to rent a tiny room on the Hill and write stories about, among other things, zombies, InstaBabies, clones made for the purpose of public executions and recreational killing sparked by conversations at Denny’s. Bridges, who grew up in Colorado and now lives in Austin, writes about the black hearts of both men and women with both levity and vitriol. The up-and-coming satirist currently works the nightshift at a bookstore in Austin; he says the “weird customers” inspire his writing. Recently, Bridges called Boulder Weekly to talk about Justice, Inc.

Books

Think

Finishing a meaty book such as War and Peace comes with a sense of accomplishment. But if reading more than 560,000 words sounds too long, try something more bite sized. Flash fiction is even briefer than short stories and uses only a handful of words to pack just as mighty a punch as longer literature.

Books

Words | Week of March 12, 2015

To Rise Again at a Decent Hour — by Joshua Ferris..

Books

a coin I am the not-iguana. the gulliver. oh mainly what I do I’m a this. This is poetry. Let us be

hand about all the mess of which is he Mr. Obama when he talks about Islam? is he the Democrat or head of State? Father? Fox? Hen? What’s that sound that bird look like, a engine?.

Books

Words | Week of March 5, 2015

Rust: The Longest War — by Jonathan Waldman..

Music

Mother of reinvention

Of Montreal’s Kevin Barnes’ latest incarnation

By Kyle Eustice

While he was growing up in Athens, Georgia, nobody in Kevin Barnes’ immediate family played music. They had a piano in the house and his sisters took piano lessons briefly, but his parents never listened to music unless they were in the car. Fortunately, the Of Montreal mastermind had some uncles and cousins who played music.

Music

Music for movement, and movement to music

Boulder Bach Festival and 3rd Law Dance/Theater collaborate on ‘Bach UnCaged’

By Peter Alexander

The Boulder Bach Festival will reprise its highly successful 2014 partnership with 3rd Law Dance/Theater with a new work that combines the music of J.S. Bach with iconoclastic 20th-century American composer John Cage.

Music

Sing

Ellis is kicking off the return of the Wildflower Concert Series on Friday night. If you haven’t seen her previously, now is your chance to catch her powerful and fun-loving show at the most beautiful and intimate venue in the county.

Music

Listen

Just in time for spring, Colorado’s own Taarka is back with a new album Making Tracks Home. Taarka’s sound is filled with a variety of different string instruments laying a foundation for vocals from husbandand-wife duo David and Enion Pelta- Tiller.

Music

Electro-evolution

Sylvan Esso's Amelia Meath on remixes and a booming career in multiple bands

By Adam Perry

The loveable electro-pop duo Sylvan Esso, based in North Carolina and featuring talented young Mountain Man singer Amelia Meath, plays the Gothic Theatre in Denver on Saturday night. The sh

Music

All in the balance

Ani DiFranco says kids brought a balance to her battle for peace and social justice

By L. Kent Wolgamott

“Relationship, family — the last two years of my life has been a lot of family. … Having kids has affected me,” DiFranco said. “It’s not in that classic way — ‘Now I need to worry about the future, environmental apocalypse, whoa, eternal warfare, whoa.’ I was always on that tip.

Music

Sing

Fifty years ago, America forever changed by ushering in the Voting Rights Act of 1965. Among other things, the time bred a rich history of music and a reawakening of spirituals from the enslaved Africans of America in the 18th and 19th centuries. The songs went on to breathe life in to the civil rights movement and inspire revolution.

Music

Mixing up more than a few tapes

After 20 years, Martin Sexton still loves doing it his way on stage

By Alan Sculley

Any list of hardest-working musicians should include the name Martin Sexton. He’s released 10 full-length studio albums over a 20-year career, and has maintained a relentless touring schedule that commonly finds him on the road for a year or more with the touring cycle for each release.

Music

Silent film and oratorio comprise Pro Musica Colorado program

By Peter Alexander

Friday, March 13 in St. John’s Cathedral, Denver, and Saturday, March 14 in First United Methodist Church, Boulder. Soloists appearing with Pro Musica and the St. John’s Cathedral Choir will be soprano Ashley Hoffman, alto Marjorie Bunday, tenor Steven Soph and bass David Farwig.

Music

Balancing act

Lola Black juggles it all

By Kyle Eustice

Sometimes I forget I’m heavily tattooed,” singer Lola Black says. “Every now and then I’ll walk by a mirror and think, ‘Oh wow, that’s quite a bit.’ I don’t realize I have that many.” As lead vocalist of the Denver-based hard rock/metal band also named Lola Black, her presence can be intimidating. On stage, her black hair is piled high on top of her head while she belts out her lyrics in high heels and a black ensemble. The seemingly endless colorful tattoos make her appearance even louder. Simply put, Black commands attention.

Panorama

New calendar service: Boulder County Events

Boulder Weekly is launching a new presentation of our calendar, now known as Boulder County Events.

Panorama

Events Calendar | Week of January 10, 2013

Surrealist painter Sky Black will exhibit his work at Trident Cafe and Bookstore in January.

Panorama

Arts | Week of January 10, 2013

Matt Smith's 'Guardians of Ediza' is among the paintings on the American West on view at Gallery 1261.

Panorama

Theater | Week of January 10, 2013

The Complete Works of Shakespeare (Abridged) continues at Jesters Dinner Theatre.

Panorama

Words | Week of January 10, 2013

Jon Sands, author of The New Clean, reads at 7 p.m. Jan. 11 at Innisfree Poetry Bookstore.

Panorama

Event Calendar | Week of January 3, 2013

Gipsy Moon plays Jan. 3 at the Pioneer Inn and Jan. 4 at Oskar Blues Home Made Liquids and Solids.

Panorama

Arts | Week of January 03, 2013

Loretta Young-Gautier´s photographs are on display at the Byers-Evans house.

Panorama

Theater | Week of January 03, 2013

Newark Violenta, a tribute to Italian crime cinema from the 1970s, premieres at The Edge Theater Company.

Panorama

Words | Week of January 03, 2013

Brian Gast, author of The Business of Wanting More, will appear at Tattered Cover Jan. 8.

Panorama

Event Calendar | Week of December 27, 2012

The Motet plays the Fox Theatre Dec. 30 and 31.

Reel To Reel

Film-to-table

Mitch Dickman on localizing Colorado’s film scene

By Michael J. Casey

This might be a little naïve,” director Mitch Dickman tells Boulder Weekly. “But I’ve been... talking about this film-to-table idea. I think the food community has done a tremendous job of capitalizing on the farm-to-table movement. I don’t think film is all that dissimilar.”

Reel To Reel

Diving into a sticky situation

‘Bethlehem’ stands out in the Boulder Jewish Film Festival lineup

By Michael J. Casey

Conflict is the heart of cinema. Conflict drives the plot and draws the audience and practically every movie revolves around it. Yet, only a select few have the audacity to dive into what fuels that conflict and, to borrow a line from The Rules of the Game, understand that “the awful thing about life is this: Everybody has their reasons.”

Reel To Reel

Calling all audiences

Deciding the fate of ‘Patrick’s Day’

By Michael J. Casey

As one who attends several film festivals a year can attest, many quality movies play once and then are never to be heard from again. Not for reasons of quality and artistry (although they factor), but because movie distributors decide to pass on these movies, and often they disappear into the ether.

Reel To Reel

Goodbye to all of that

Beyond the end with ‘Goodbye to Language’

By Michael J. Casey

In 1960, Jean-Luc Godard revolutionized cinema. Breathless wasn’t just a break from the old ways of filmmaking, it was as if cinema had cracked off and begun again. Seven years later, Godard concluded Weekend with the title card, “Fin... de cinema.” It was a cheeky moment, but for the French critic turned filmmaker, it had razor sharp teeth. Now the 84-yearold director is back with another entry into his ever-evolving theory of cinema and this time around he tackles the money-grubbing gimmick of 3-D. Only in the hands of Godard, it isn’t a gimmick, it’s just another arrow in his quiver.

Reel To Reel

Fight

Climate change has been rippling through our world for the past few decades. Colorado is suffering from summer-like temperatures in winter to a severe fire season that’s destroying its forests. Firefighters are on the front line of this problem seeing the lasting damages and devastation.

Reel To Reel

To God, there is no zero

From the infinitesimal to the infinite in ‘The Incredible Shrinking Man’

By Michael J. Casey

They called them “B-Movies,” genre films (westerns, noir, horror, sci-fi, etc.) made on shoestring budgets with leads played by actors, not stars, and directors who were journeymen, not auteurs. The 1950s were their heyday and they played great on a rainy Saturday afternoon.

Reel To Reel

film

THE BABADOOK This movie is being pigeon-holed as horror, but don’t discount it. It compares well with Kubricks’s The Shining and Polanski’s Rosemary’s Baby as a deeply nuanced and powerful film, well worth the scary bits.

Reel To Reel

Photographing philosophy

By Michael J. Casey

Photographing philosophy.

Reel To Reel

Punch

Documentary Fight Church tells the story of the meeting of two unlikely worlds: Christianity and mixed martial arts. While, of course, it’s natural for pastors to have hobbies, cage fighting is a peculiar choice for those who preach to “love thy neighbor.

Reel To Reel

When the good comes undone

The bleak fallout of ‘Little Accidents’

By Michael J. Casey

There is Owen ( Jacob Lofland), a high school student who lost his father in the cavein. Owen has taken on the responsibility of his brother with Down syndrome (Beau Wright) while his mother (Chloë Sevigny) tries to put food on the table.

Screen

Home is wherever I’m with you

Tim Johnson brings families together at ‘Home’

By Michael J. Casey

I’ve just always been fascinated by what happens when you take a doodle and breathe life into it,” animation director Tim Johnson says, describing his career and passion. Ever since the birth of the flickering image, writers, directors, animators and viewers have been enamored by the simple act of watching an idea come to life and move.

Screen

Define ‘run’

‘Run All Night’ has old men slowly shuffling

By Ryan Syrek

At this point, there is just one Liam Neeson movie: Taken a Non-Stop Run All Night to Walk Among the Tombstones 3. Neeson isn’t in the midst of some Nicolas Cage supernova, in which an actor’s need to perpetually work and “get dat paper” creates an acting black hole more realistic than anything in Interstellar. It’s worse. Sadder somehow. Neeson is still trying, still making a genuine effort in each of these rote, clichéd, repetitive “old man” action movies.

Screen

Chap-hazard

‘Chappie’ is too weird or not weird enough

By Ryan Syrek

Instead, the plot is nothing but a tired reworking of artificial intelligence clichés. Deon (Dev Patel) is a programmer who helped bring an automated robotic police force to Johannesburg. He wants to take the tech even further, much like the real-world scientists who are undoubtedly hastening our demise at the hands of our future robot overlords.

Screen

What happens when a son sets out to profile his father?

Documentary reveals the history of far more than a record store

By Elizabeth Miller

The documentary film Old Man is as much a story of a troubled, perhaps marginally dysfunctional family as it is the story of a troubled record store — and, in many ways, a dysfunctional town. The portrait of Boulder is not graceful. It’s a critique of the town’s ability to win both for greatest number of advanced degrees per capita and for high incidence of teen suicide and drug use. That’s the context the film’s director Dan Schneidkraut leans on to make a far more personal story make sense — one that’s about his father, Andy, owner of the Boulder institution Albums on the Hill.

Screen

Cons, vexing

‘Focus’ is irritatingly almost good.

By Ryan Syrek

Despite its title and the fact that Will Smith continually mouth-dumps exposition about how pulling a con requires attention to detail, Focus is hella sloppy. It’s not just that genuinely thrilling “who’s playing who” moments bump up against a holistically unbelievable romantic core, it’s that writers/directors Glenn Ficarra and John Requa never decided on the movie’s tone. Lithe and funny until it’s leaden and obtuse, Focus would be pleasantly forgettable were it not for Margot Robbie, who is announced here as a capital letter Movie Star.

Screen

Hello, GoodBye

Bidding Farewell to a long-time friend Bill Vielehr —a Rembrance

By Dave Kirby

The BIFF Chairman and longtime Boulder metal sculptor left this planet unexpectedly last October — a shock to the system for his staggeringly wide circle of friends, including this writer — but Kathy Beeck, BIFF co-founder and a friend of Vielehr’s...

Screen

Best in show

BIFF brings another great year of films

The Boulder International Film Festival is the cherry on top for a town with an already-impressive film scene. Throw in some big stars, up-and-coming filmmakers, foreign favorites and fascinating documentaries and you’ve got the perfect weekend for a cinephile. Here’s a look at a handful of stand-out films visiting this year.

Screen

Please sir, may I have my job?

‘Two Days, One Night’ pits poor versus poor

By Ryan Syrek

Sit down, Sartre. Writers/directors Jean-Pierre and Luc Dardenne get it a bit more right: Hell isn’t just other people. Hell is asking other people to surrender their bonuses so you can keep your job. Two Days, One Night is a harrowing social allegory, a dramatic minimization of a growing socioeconomic reality. The bosses of the world are greedily devouring an ever-expanding amount of wealth, leaving the impoverished to fight each other for table scraps. It is undignified, disgusting and downright heartbreaking to watch human beings alternate between fighting and begging each other for basic survival needs.

Screen

Shadyac's Travels

Boulder has a new face, CU has a new professor and a filmmaker has a new lease on life

By Michael J. Casey

The artist’s life is one of constant searching. Theirs is a restless journey, one constantly straining to see over the next horizon — and filmmaker Tom Shadyac’s journey has taken some unexpected turns that have finally brought him to Boulder.

Screen

I’m-a let you finish, but…

The only list of the best and worst films of 2014 you need

By Ryan Syrek

Somehow Jake Gyllenhaal has transformed into one of the best actors of our era. His performance here is diabolically perfect. Writer/director Dan Gilroy spits in the face of screenwriting 101, as his main character never evolves or changes. Oh, and if there was an award for “best scene of the year,” the final shootout in this one would be a shoo-in.

Stage

Free-range art

Boulder Arts Week is both about drawing audiences in and bringing art out into the world

By Elizabeth Miller

Somewhere between the cupcakes and the ciabatta, a cluster of singers will belt out love ballads. Watercolor landscape paintings will provide a backdrop to the rods and reels for sale at Front Range Anglers. The tale of Little Red Riding Hood will be retold — for adults — with shadow puppets on the walls of a dance studio.

Stage

Fleshing the bones

MESA’s sexual assault poetry event strives to put faces to statistics

By Amanda Moutinho

Talking about sexual assault is uncomfortable. It’s sensitive, disruptive and combative. But talking about sexual assault is vital, says poet Dominique Christina. “You have to interrupt, and you have to agitate,” Christina says. “I’m interested in radical conversations that pull people into consciousness and call power out. You have to risk the discomfort because you know what the end game is, and you know how bad it can be if you don’t. All of it is inconvenient. Any fight is inconvenient. Any rebellion is inconvenient. Any revolution is inconvenient.”

Stage

Sign

American Sign Language is an expressive language that doesn’t use volume or tone to make a point, but uses expression and movement instead. While most poetry is associated with spoken word, ASL Slam is working to expand those limits and provide a platform for literary and performing artists in the deaf community.

Stage

Theater | Week of March 26, 2015

A Public Reading of an Unproduced Screenplay About the Death of Walt Disney..

Stage

Dairy Center’s renovations will squeeze Boulder’s performance space options during construction

By Elizabeth Miller

Performing arts companies in Boulder have few options for venues to book within city limits that meet the needs dictated by time, space and cost. Theater companies in town point to The Dairy Center for the Arts as the only real option for a professional production. But with the planned closures of its theatrical performance spaces, the East and the Carson theaters, from January to August 2016, those theater companies won’t just be bumping up against one another trying to fit into limited space for their productions. They’ll be downright homeless.

Stage

More than meets the eye

‘Urinetown’ brings pee jokes to the point of a call for revolution

By Amanda Moutinho

I don’t think too many people are going to come see this musical...” says a skeptical Little Sally at the end of Urinetown. Sure, the subject matter’s a little iffy, the moral is depressing and talk about an unappetizing title, but considering the full auditorium on opening night at the Longmont Theatre Company, Little Sally might be wrong.

Stage

Watch

With a little imagination, Shakespeare’s work can be a theatrical playground. When theater companies take a different approach, it revitalizes the Bard and gives it a fresh approach for modern audiences.

Stage

Theater | Week of March 19, 2015

Stupid F##king Bird — presented by Boulder Ensemble Theatre Company..

Stage

Storytelling takes the stage

Local Lab pares down the spectacle to let the raw, experimental core of theater shine through

By Elizabeth Miller

Theater, at its core, is storytelling. It’s a gathering together to hear another’s life story, to see ourselves in those stories in ways that make our own stories make a little more sense and to experience that catharsis as part of an audience. At Local Lab, the three-day festival of new plays, the experience is stripped back to just the stories. Actors read from scripts still in hand. Playwrights take chances and venture experiments they wouldn’t in the presence of New York City’s daunting theater scene.

Stage

Life on pointe

Young ballerinas work hard and dream big

By Devin Blomquist

Young ballerinas are dispersed throughout the building, stretching their long, lean limbs, lacing up their satin pointe shoes and sitting patiently as mothers, friends or teachers apply finishing touches on hair and makeup at the Youth America Grand Prix Regional Semi-Finals in Denver in late February. Some stand against railings and cabinets at the Newman Center for the Performing Arts to balance themselves while going through the motions of their upcoming performances. First position, second position, third position, fourth. Repeat. Repeat. Repeat.

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