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Browse Boulder real estate by neighborhood, school and zip code along with other homes for sale in Colorado on COhomefinder.com.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 
Boulderganic

Fire mitigation tangles with marketplace

By Caitlin Rockett

So in January of last year, the county rolled out a program called Wildfire Partners, a group of specialists tasked with helping these residents assess vulnerabilities in their property and do work — from large jobs like cutting trees and replacing...

Boulderganic

Climate’s threat to wheat is rising by degrees

One degree of warming could cause devestating shortages of this staple

By Paul Brown

An international consortium of scientists have been testing wheat crops in laboratory and field trials in many areas of the world in changing climate condition and discovered that yields drop on average by 6 percent for every one degree Celsius rise in temperature.

Boulderganic

Tiny homes and tiny roadblocks

How small can you live in Boulder County?

By Christi Turner

An entrepreneur and construction expert, Fears says he thinks the Aspen has used its square footage optimally. The 24 feet by 7 feet of space occupied by this “Tiny,” as Fears affectionately refers to all super-small dwellings — otherwise known as tiny homes, tiny houses or micro-homes — is permanently mounted to a specially designed steel trailer.

Boulderganic

Fracking’s future is in doubt as oil price plummets

There are warnings that the industry faces a crisis

By Kieran Cooke

Fracking has become a victim of its own success. The industry in the U.S. has grown very fast. In 2008, U.S. oil production was running at five million barrels a day. Thanks to fracking, that figure has nearly doubled, with talk of U.S.

Boulderganic

Conserving water, energy and food on campus

A CU Boulder student pushes to examine the effects of trayless dining in campus cafeterias

By April Nowicki

“It’s supposed to save water and save energy, and people also take less food when they don’t have a tray, because they can’t stack it up as much. So you don’t have as much food waste,” says Courtlyn Carpenter, a sophomore who researched trayless dining during her freshman year at the University of Colorado Boulder.

Boulderganic

Roots in the water

Sustainable wastewater treatment from Boulder to ‘The Smiling Coast of Africa’

By Christi Turner

That’s how the Boulderbased company Agua Inc describes its rich collection of macrophytes, a class of plants that dominate wetlands, streams and shallow lake ecosystems in the wild. Macrophytes are also the key to Agua’s vision: helping to make clean, safe water attainable in the poorest and least developed corners of the globe.

Boulderganic

Climate talks take a rocky road to Paris

The UN climate talks in Lima have ended with the setting of deadlines for the world to come up with plans to curb emissions and adapt to climate change.

By Paul Brown

By Nov. 1 the secretariat of the United Nations Climate Change Convention is supposed to have assessed whether the commitment of these 196 nations is enough to stop the world overheating — and, if it is not, to point out by how far they will miss the target.

Boulderganic

Filling the gap

Planning for population growth and water scarcity

By Taylor Winchell

According to a 2014 report by the Colorado Department of Local Affairs, the population of Colorado is expected to see an additional 2.5 million people by 2040.

Boulderganic

Eco-challenged tech

Though 3-D printing may lead in new manufacturing processes, it lags in sustainability

By April Nowicki

Three-D printing is the new industrial revolution. Ty Syt, a member of the Boulder hackerspace Solid State Depot, says interest in 3-D printing will only continue to grow as more people learn to use the technology.

Boulderganic

Demonized science

New book argues climate change messengers are seeing unparalleled attacks

By Tim Radford

According to a new book by veteran environmentalist George Marshall, thousands of abusive emails — including demands that he commit suicide or be “shot, quartered and fed to the pigs, along with your family” — were received by climate scientist...

Eco-Briefs

eco-briefs

In 2008, the Wyoming Weather Modification Pilot Project embarked on a $13 million endeavor to study snowfall created from cloud seeding over the course of six winters in southern Wyoming.

Eco-Briefs

ECO-BRIEFS

The list includes poachers, smugglers, traffickers and polluters that contribute to what Interpol says is a $70-$213 billion dollar industry annually. According to Interpol, one East African terror group makes up to $56 million a year in illegal coal trade.

Eco-Briefs

eco-briefs

By Joel Dyer

The outcome was not a surprise to most observers who knew that Monsanto and the industrial food complex would stop at nothing to defeat the measure. Meetings had been held by industry insiders several months ago at The Broadmoor in Colorado Springs to create a strategy for defeating this Colorado citizens’ proposition.

Eco-Briefs

eco-briefs

By Elizabeth Miller

The first ever Boulder Rights of Nature Film Festival will be showcasing films that recognize those long-forgotten inalienable rights for ecosystems, wildlife and traditional cultures.

Eco-Briefs

eco-briefs

CLIMATE CHANGE EVANGELIST TO SPEAK AT CHAUTAUQUA AUDITORIUM

By Cassie Moore

She is an atmospheric scientist who studies climate change and its effect on humans and the natural environment, and she is also a conservative Christian. Hayhoe is coming to Boulder on a campaign to bridge the gap between those who believe in climate change and those who believe it is incompatible with their faith-based be.

Eco-Briefs

eco-briefs

By Cassie Moore

In 1939, Rossby waves were discovered in jet streams and were linked to high and low pressure systems at ground level, which form Earth’s daily weather. The weather on Earth’s surface is controlled by jet streams, which are high winds in the atmosphere.

Eco-Briefs

eco-briefs

By Scott Fromberg

Center. As a consequence, serious flooding occurred, leaving thousands of people displaced, hundreds of homes destroyed and eight people dead, according to a FEMA disaster report. While memories of these tragic events may be all too fresh at this point, that will not always be the case.

Eco-Briefs

Eco-briefs

By Scott Fromberg

“From our perspective, we are looking forward to working with the county and state to promote extra tourism and recreation in the area,” says Megan Crandell, a Bureau of Land Management representative. But, she adds, “There’s no official proposal yet.”.

Eco-Briefs

eco-briefs

A recent study from the Institute for Geophysics at The University of Texas at Austin reveals that geothermal heat is melting the glacier from below. This heat under the glacier might be a key factor in the ice sheet’s ability to slide, which impacts the glacier’s stability as a whole.

Eco-Briefs

eco-briefs

“Online databases, smartphone apps, crowd-sourcing and new hardware devices are making it easier to collect data on species,” Stuart L. Pimm, Doris Duke Professor of Conservation Ecology at Duke, said in a press release. “Most species remain unknown to science, and they likely face greater threats than the ones we do know.

Special Editions

The plentiful bounty of fall

We go beyond food to look at how Colorado hemp farmers struggle to grow this newly regulated (and highly useful) crop, the difficulties the marijuana industry confronts in producing a truly organic product and how one century-old building is leading the way in sustainable architecture.

Special Editions

Fish food

A local business looks to help schools across America learn about sustainable food production through grants for aquaponic systems

By Mallane Dressel

The Aquaponic Source, a company based out of Longmont, hopes to increase the number of aquaponic systems being used in classrooms across that nation with their new Grants for Plants Foundation, but some Boulder County students are already reaping the benefits.

Special Editions

Processed food nation

Boulder author Melanie Warner discusses the dangers of processed foods

By Andrea Neville

“I first started writing about the food industry about 10 years ago,” Warner continues. “When I started talking to people in the field of food science, they started telling me all these crazy things about the incredible technical complexity that goes into making our food.

Special Editions

Full backpacks, full stomachs

Colorado Friendship improves food security for Longmont students

By Mallane Dressel

As the temperature drops and the leaves change color, kids around the nation get back into the swing of school. For some students it means little more than early mornings and evenings lost to homework, but for others, it means knowing they won’t go home hungry — at least during the week.

Special Editions

The dirt on reusing soil

Save money and up your gardening IQ by reconditioning and reusing this year’s potting soil for next season

By Caitlin Rockett

In places where winters can get harsh — and there will be at least a couple of harsh winter weeks here on the Front Range — soil will expand and contract, so a mindful gardener will want to empty plastic, ceramic or clay containers to prevent them from cracking.

Special Editions

Soot on snow

A Colorado native researches how ‘black carbon’ from increased wildfire is changing snowmelt, and consequently water supplies, in the West

By Christi Turner

The duo of snowmobiles has climbed to over 6,000 feet elevation, halfway to the study site where researcher Susan Kaspari and her small team will dig into six feet of snow and sample for soot, more accurately known as black carbon.

Special Editions

The pros and cons of industrial-scale solar

The world’s largest solar thermal power plant is intended to lessen reliance on traditional forms of energy, but some question whether the environmental impacts outweigh the benefits

By Christi Turner

It’s an undeniably gruesome image: A bird soars over the Mojave desert, and suddenly, revoltingly, catches fire, streaks momentarily like a small meteor, and then seems to disappear, leaving only smoke. Seen from afar, some are calling them “streamers.

Special Editions

Profile of a sustainability hub

The century-old Alliance Center in Denver emerges from a renovation more sustainable than ever

By Christi Turner

It’s been 10 years since the Alliance Center took up residence as a multitenant co-working space on Wynkoop Street in Denver; grassroots powerhouses like Conservation Colorado have anchored the center since it opened its doors in 2004. But this August, it emerged from eight months of multimillion-dollar renovation as a true bastion of sustainability.

Special Editions

Marijuana Growing Practices

So, what exactly are you smoking?

By Melissa Schaaf

The passage of Amendment 64 in Colorado legalized recreational marijuana for those 21 years of age or older, and House Bill 1317 initiated mandatory potency testing — but only for the recreational stuff.

Special Editions

Zero waste heroes

One sustainably minded couple’s quest to open a zero-waste grocery store

By Gloria Dickie

Such plastic purging is slowly catching on in North America as awareness about plastic pollution and negative health effects grows. But for many practitioners, divesting their lifestyles of plastic waste can be challenging — and inconvenient. The Mandersons hope to change that.

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