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Boulderganic

Put your money where your mouth is

Students ask CU to divest from fossil fuels 

By Steven Kreimendahl

Raitz says the focus of the current campaign by Fossil Free CU is to show how the divestment would benefit the campus by bringing in talented leadership and students in the environmental and social entrepreneurial fields.

Boulderganic

Mosquito control

Managing disease comes with environmental concerns

By Caitlin Rockett

It’s an unfortunate fact of life that along with those endless dog days of summer — perfect for barbeques, biking, hiking and swimming — also comes the height of mosquito season. While these blood-sucking members of the fly family are often little more than nuisances, certain species of mosquitoes can carry dangerous diseases, such as West Nile.

Boulderganic

Global warming meltdown in the Rockies?

Mountain ecosystems take early hit

By Bob Berwyn

Anyone who tackles a tough summit like Tenmile Peak, above Frisco, probably is already tuned in to the risks of the high alpine zone — rockfall, changeable weather, equipment failure. But a snowboarder who was injured in a May 2010 avalanche on the peak may add a new item to the list of dangers — climate change.

Boulderganic

Fight for your right (to know what's in your food)

Colorado takes its place in a growing grassroots movement that believes citizens have a right to know when their food contains genetically engineered ingredients

By Caitlin Rockett

Larry Cooper describes he and his wife Tryna simply as “concerned citizens” — proud grandparents seven times over, owners of a meeting and event company. Their concern over the safety of American food became so great, however, that the couple placed themselves at the helm of a citizen-led movement in Colorado to require labeling products that contain genetically engineered ingredients.

Boulderganic

Eco vehicles difficult to integrate

Wait ten years to see signs of zero-emissions vehicle market saturation

By Scott Fromberg

Despite the City of Boulder’s ongoing efforts to install charging stations, zero-emissions vehicles still have a long way to go to catch up with their gas-fueled competitors on the highway of American automobiles. But last year, the Electric Drive Transportation Association reported a 330 percent sales increase in zero-emissions vehicles. Though that’s a boom, we’re still looking at a decade before zero-emissions vehicles make up a significant portion of the cars on the road.

Boulderganic

Climate change or global warming?

New Yale study finds that which term we use makes big difference in how we gauge the threat and what actions we take.

By Steven Kreimendahl

More Americans say the term “global warming” is bad news than take that view when the term “climate change” is used instead, according to a recent study from the Yale Project on Climate Change Communications and the George Mason University Center for Climate Change Communications.

Boulderganic

Will El Nino bring more flooding misery?

Historic climate records suggest a wet summer for Boulder

By Bob Berwyn

Meeting with colder air, the entire mass is nudged into a counter-clockwise swirl, recognizable as a near-spiral cloud band, or a comma-shaped plug, moving toward the west coast of North America in cyclical undulations.

Boulderganic

Can the state water plan bridge the gap?

Front Range, West Slope still miles apart on vision for Colorado’s water future

By Bob Berwyn

When Colorado’s earth cracked open in the great drought of 2002, it may have also cracked open a new corner of consciousness about the finite nature of the state’s water supplies.

Boulderganic

Poor air quality and health problems could become the summertime norm throughout the US

Scientists predict a 70 percent rise in ground-level ozone — unless action is taken to cut emissions

By Tim Radford

Gabriele Pfister, an atmospheric scientist at the National Center for Atmosphere Research (NCAR), and research colleagues report in the Journal of Geophysical Research: Atmospheres that Americans face a rise of 70 percent in summertime ozone levels by 2050.

Boulderganic

Round-the-clock solar power arrives

Engineering allows the power of the Sun to keep electricity turbines running both night and day.

The Gemasolar plant near the Spanish city of Seville, built by Torresol Energy, can store enough heat to operate for 18 hours at full capacity without any additional power from the sun. For many Gemasol Solar’s plant produces solar energy in cloudy weather and after sundown.

Eco-Briefs

eco-briefs

By Scott Fromberg

Center. As a consequence, serious flooding occurred, leaving thousands of people displaced, hundreds of homes destroyed and eight people dead, according to a FEMA disaster report. While memories of these tragic events may be all too fresh at this point, that will not always be the case.

Eco-Briefs

Eco-briefs

By Scott Fromberg

“From our perspective, we are looking forward to working with the county and state to promote extra tourism and recreation in the area,” says Megan Crandell, a Bureau of Land Management representative. But, she adds, “There’s no official proposal yet.”.

Eco-Briefs

eco-briefs

A recent study from the Institute for Geophysics at The University of Texas at Austin reveals that geothermal heat is melting the glacier from below. This heat under the glacier might be a key factor in the ice sheet’s ability to slide, which impacts the glacier’s stability as a whole.

Eco-Briefs

eco-briefs

“Online databases, smartphone apps, crowd-sourcing and new hardware devices are making it easier to collect data on species,” Stuart L. Pimm, Doris Duke Professor of Conservation Ecology at Duke, said in a press release. “Most species remain unknown to science, and they likely face greater threats than the ones we do know.

Eco-Briefs

eco-briefs

According to the American Heart Association, pollutants related to fuel combustion are the most serious because they are tiny and harder prevent. They lead to irritation of the lungs and blood vessels around the heart. Short-term exposure can increase risk of stroke and heart attack.

Eco-Briefs

eco-briefs

“There is an urgent need to hold the world’s largest corporations accountable for the massive environmental destruction, human rights violations and climate pollution they cause,” Lindsey Allen, executive director for Rainforest Action Network, said in a press release.

Eco-Briefs

eco-briefs

Once a testament to human ingenuity, river dams are now more often cited as examples of human intervention gone too far in manipulating the natural world. We’ve begun to better understand the effects of dams on river ecology and fish populations and raise concerns about their effects on the life and health of rivers. DamNation, a documentary film, explores that evolution from the welcome the Hoover Dam received to the welcomed destruction of dams and the free flow of water that resumed.

Eco-Briefs

eco-briefs

Stream flows in watersheds with bark beetle infestation increase by about 30 percent, according to new research from the National Science Foundation, and can be connected to previous research that found an increase in carcinogenic disinfection by-products in water.

Eco-Briefs

eco-briefs

By Mallane Dressel

According to Alexandra Rose, citizen science coordinator at the University of Colorado Museum of Natural History, a condor’s decisions on whom they feed and interact with are connected to the condor’s ability to survive. Researchers have over 175,000 automatically recorded images taken of condor groups as they feed on carcasses.

Eco-Briefs

eco-briefs

By Mallane Dressel

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service reopened the public comment forum concerning the western yellow-billed cuckoo being added to the threatened species list for a second time in response to public demand and to allow researchers more time to finish collecting scientific information.

Special Editions

Boulderganic Summer issue is here!

As residents of the Centennial State, we know Colorado is beautiful — from the farms of its sweeping eastern plains to the rugged, snow-capped peaks of the Rocky Mountains to its semi-arid southwestern chaparral deserts. It’s not hard to understand why Colorado is the fourth fastest growing state in the nation.

Special Editions

Ash borers? You can blame Marco Polo’s camels

With limited treatment options, arborists emphasize replanting with different species

By Bob Berwyn

The story of invasive species goes all the way back to the earliest stages of human development, when bands of hominids dispersing from Africa carried with them the crumbs, seeds and eggs of whatever ecosystems they happened to be passing through. And you can be sure that, along with silk and spices, Marco Polo’s camels transported disease-ridden fleas between Europe and Asia.

Special Editions

New hydropower could ease transition from fossil fuels

New study suggests the U.S. could add enough hydropower to provide electricity for up to 65 million homes

By Bob Berwyn

If you’ve ever spent time around one of Colorado’s rivers or streams during spring and summer runoff, you’ve had a taste of nature at its best. Supercharged, ionized air, forest and wildflowers, and, above all, massive torrents of water sweeping from the high Rockies out into the plains, or through sandstone canyons toward the distant Pacific.

Special Editions

Green your grill

Your charcoal grill is bad for the environment and your health, but making it more environmentally friendly is easy to do

By Caitlin Rockett

It’s a tradition that’s quintessential to summer. It just doesn’t quite feel like summer until you’ve tossed a few burgers (maybe a couple portabella caps for the veggie crowd) on the grill, a cold beer in one hand and tongs in the other. But few of us ever stop to think about the environmental impact of our summer barbeques.

Special Editions

Corporate gardening for a sustainable world

Making a difference on your lunch break with CorpCROP

By Andrea Neville

CorpCROP is on a mission to get you off your chair and out into the sunlight. With the rise in health issues due to sitting behind a desk all day, people like Jennifer Klafin, founder and managing director of CorpCROP, are figuring out ways to help keep office workers happier and healthier.

Special Editions

Reinventing the toilet

University of Colorado team uses the power of the sun to turn human waste into fuel

By Steven Kreimendahl

Karl Linden and his research team are not reinventing the wheel, but they are trying to reinvent the toilet. It began several years ago for Linden, a professor of environmental engineering at the University of Colorado Boulder, in a class he taught about water sanitation and hygiene. He gave a short assignment about potential global health initiatives.

Special Editions

Nothing but net-zero

One Boulder County residence just took energy efficiency to a new level

By Haley Gray

Boulder County’s most energy efficient home sits at 6712 Jay Road. The residence, to be completed within a year, is expected to produce 29 percent more energy than it consumes using a combination of solar, wind and geothermal systems.

Special Editions

A community mission

The Second Kitchen food co-op expands fast without forgetting why they started in the first place

By Mallane Dressel

Boulder’s first food co-op, The Second Kitchen, is trying to make a bigger difference when it comes to quality and sustainability of food distribution, while not forgetting their humble beginnings. The organization’s name is a tribute to those humble begins, when co-founder Sara Brody once used the second kitchen of her duplex to house large sacks of grains and other products for it’s first few years as a buy-in club.

Special Editions

One man’s trash is another man’s business venture

New state legislation aims to clean up and close Colorado’s tire dumps while stimulating the market for recycling

By Scott Fromberg

Northeast of Denver in the small town of Hudson lies the largest tire dump in the U.S., known by many as Tire Mountain. Immediately south of Colorado Springs sits the nation’s second largest tire dump. Combined, the Rubber Manufacturing Association says, Colorado’s tire dumps, known as monofills, accounted for 40 percent of the nation’s waste tires in 2011 — an estimated 60 million tires.

Special Editions

Playing hurt

Why ignoring injuries leads to more trouble

By James Dziezynski

Many people identify strongly with their favorite sports. Because of that passion — or obsession — we get used to playing hurt. It’s not unusual to see people scaling the walls at the climbing gym with a soft cast on their leg or watching runners zip around trails with their arm in a sling.

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